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I have a site with a sticky footer and i want to have a background image at the top of my contentContainer. With a border its fine but if i remove the border from content"thin blue solid" the whole thing is pushed down and my background image is no longer right at the top...

<div id="mainContain">
    <div id="header"></div>     
    <div id="contentContain">
        <div id="content">
            <h2>Hog</h2>
        </div>  
    </div>
    <div id="footer"></div>
</div>

My CSS is:

html, body {
  padding: 0;
  margin: 0;
  height: 100%;
}
#mainContain {
    min-height: 100%;
    position:relative;
}

#header {
    width: 100%;
    height: 180px;
    background-color: #111111;
}

#contentContain {
    background-image: url('../img/shadow-bg.png');
    background-position: center top;
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    padding-bottom: 45px;   /* This value is the height of your footer */
}

#content {
    margin: auto;
    border: thin blue solid;
}

#footer {
      position: absolute;
      Width: 100%;
      bottom: 0;
      height: 45px;  /* This value is the height of your footer */
      background-color: #111111;
}
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1  
Sounds like margin collapse. –  cimmanon Jun 20 '13 at 17:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are probably seeing the results of collapsing margins.

You can prevent margins from collapsing by either adding a border or some padding to the top of your block element, or by creating a new block formatting context by setting overflow: auto, for example:

#content {
    margin: auto;
    border: thin transparent solid; /* option 1 */
    padding-top: 1px; /* option 2 */
    overflow: auto; /* option 3 */
}  

Which Option to Use

If you use the first two options, you are adding an extra 1px of height to the top of your block element by virtue of either the width of the border or the padding.

The third option using overflow will not affect the height of the element.

The first two options will probably be backwards compatible to all but the most primitive browsers. Anything that supports CSS2.1 will work as expected.

As for overflow, it is widely supported all the way back to IE4 with a few minor exceptions. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/overflow for details.

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Thanks for your help, each option solves the problem! I was wondering which option would be preferable as they all work, but is one more likely to work in older browsers than another? Thanks again... –  user2078845 Jun 20 '13 at 17:52
    
Please see additional comments in answer. All the best! –  Marc Audet Jun 20 '13 at 18:04

I think that you can use box-shadow property instead of border property.

Your layout won't change.

box-shadow: 0 0 1px 2px navy; /*For example*/

The subyacente idea is that the shadow works like a border.

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I think the cause of your problem deals with the fact that you had a border rule managing the border portion of the box object '#content'. When you remove the rule it reverts to it's default.

I take it that you were using margin: auto to provide horizontal centering. You might want to break it down to individual side (using long-hand here):

[UPDATED]

#content {
    border-top: 0px;
    border-left: auto;
    border-right auto;
}
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Try to use that HTML structure:

<div id="mainContain"><div id="header"></div>    
<div id="contentContain">
    <div id="backTop"></div>
    <div id="content">
        <h2>Hog</h2>
        <h2>Hog</h2>
        <h2>Hog</h2>
    </div>
</div>
<div id="footer">YAY</div>

In the DIV with backTop you can add your BACKGROUND-IMAGE and the position would keep the top position.

In the css file put the code for your background image and you're done, your background is always at the top.

I made an example.

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Looks like your h2 is pushing the container down. I just remove contentContain because not sure why you need it? Once you place the background inside content div then works fine.

HTML:

<div id="mainContain">
 <div id="header">
 </div><!-- End of header -->
 <div id="content">
  <h2>Hog</h2>
  <h2>Hog</h2>
  <h2>Hog</h2>
 </div><!-- End of content -->

 <div id="footer">
 </div><!-- End of footer -->

</div><!-- End of mainContain -->

CSS:

html, body {
 padding: 0;
 margin: 0;
 height: 100%;
}

#mainContain {
 min-height: 100%;
 position:relative;
}

#header {
 width: 100%;
 height: 180px;
 background-color: #111111;
}

/* #contentContain {
 background: url('http://baconmockup.com/400/300') no-repeat center 0;
 padding-bottom: 45px;   This value is the height of your footer
} */

#content {
 margin: auto;
 /* border: thin solid blue; */
 background: url('http://baconmockup.com/400/300') no-repeat center 0;
 padding-bottom: 45px;   /* This value is the height of your footer */
}

#footer {
  position: absolute;
  Width: 100%;
  bottom: 0;
  height: 45px;  /* This value is the height of your footer */
  background-color: #111111;
}

jsFiddle example

UPDATE As Marc Audet pointed out just add

overflow:auto;

Update

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