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I'm having trouble with the things I am and am not allowed to do with arrays and pointers in the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#define MAX 1000

void swap (char *v[], int i, int j);

main() {

    int i = 1, j = 2;
    int count;

    char *a = "Bill ", *b = "went ", *c = "to the ", *d = "grocery store.";
    char *v[MAX];

    v[0] = a;
    v[1] = b;
    v[2] = c;
    v[3] = d;

    printf("String before swapping elements at index %d and %d: \n",i,j);
    for(count = 0; count < 4; ++count)
        printf("%s",v[count]);
    printf("\n");
    swap(v,i,j);
    printf("String after swapping elements at index %d and %d: \n",i,j);
    for(count = 0; count < 4; ++count)
        printf("%s",v[count]);
    printf("\n");

    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}

void swap (char *v[], int i, int j)
{
    char *temp;

    temp = v[i];
    v[i] = v[j];
    v[j] = temp;
}

Two things come to mind:

Why can't I write v[] = {a,b,c,d} after declaring *v[MAX]? In fact, I did a quick test and even this isn't allowed:

char v[MAX];
v[] = {'w','o','r','d','s'};

whereas char v[] = {'w','o','r','d','s'}; is accepted. Why is that?

Second thing, how can I re-write the for loop without having to use a magic number (in this case 4)? I tried using strlen in various ways but I got an error each time. The best I could come up with is a somewhat clumsy solution of declaring char *k; and changing the loop condition to

for(count = 0, k = v; *(k-1); ++count, ++k)
    printf("%s",v[count]);

Surely there must be a more elegant way to loop through the v array?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

how can I re-write the for loop without having to use a magic number (in this case 4)?

One way of doing this, is to add a special terminator value ( usually NULL) in the array that you are iterating, e.g.

char *v[] = { a, b, c, d, NULL };

for(count = 0; v[count] != NULL; ++count)
    printf("%s",v[count]);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that works! As a side question, when I write *[v] = {a,b,c,d} or {a,b,c,d,'\0'} or {a,b,c,d,NULL}, strlen(v) gives me 3 instead of 4. Why is that? –  Amalgam54 Jun 20 '13 at 18:29
    
And now it's giving me a length of 85 even though I didn't change the code at all... I hate non-deterministic errors :/ –  Amalgam54 Jun 20 '13 at 18:31
    
@amalgam54. You can't use strlen(v), its behavior is undefined in your case. You should get a big fat warning (or error, depending on your compiler settings), when you compile this. v is not a char pointer (string), it is an array of char pointers (strings). A decent compiler will flag this. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jun 20 '13 at 21:16
char *v[] = { a, b, c, d};
int size = sizeof(v)/sizeof(*v);//4
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