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Suppose I am testing a method which has a dependency on a (imported) singleton instance called WS (Web Service), which has a method, url(url: String), which takes a URL and returns a request.

def doRequest(url: String): Future[Response] = {
  val request = WS.url(url)
  for {
    response <- request.post(params)
  } yield {
    val res: JsResult[MyResult] = response.json.validate[MyResult]
    res.getOrElse(throw new NotSupportedException)
  }
}

I would like to be able to inject the WS dependency such that my unit tests do not require an actual outbound http request, but can instead depend on a mock WS instance.

This has been a challenge for me because, while a singleton technically does have a type (Class[WS.type]), the WS's properties and methods are lost when binding the singleton to a val which expects a Class[WS.type]. This means that I cannot simply use a simple cake pattern, like so:

trait WSComponent {
  val ws: Class[_ <: WS.type]
}

object ApplicationContext extends WSComponent {
  val ws = WS
}

object TestContext extends WSComponent {
  val ws = mock[WS]
}

If I do this, and then make calls to WS's methods in either context, I get a compilation error, which is that Class[_ <: WS.type] has no method called (for example) url().

For what seems like a similar reason (basically, singleton objects don't have types--even though they do--), I cannot provide an implicit parameter which takes a WS.type, because, again, I will lose the methods and properties that were declared on the singleton object.

What approaches are there for injecting dependencies on singleton objects? I enjoy using the cake pattern for DI, but it introduces quite a bit of boilerplate to my code, so the ideal solution would not compound the code with too much more boilerplate.

Thank you in advance for any suggestions.

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1  
how can you have val ws: Class[_ <: WS.type] and in a subtype val ws = WS? Don't you mean val ws: WS.type? –  gourlaysama Jun 20 '13 at 19:13
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Singleton object do have types, and you can call methods on them:

scala> val i: Int.type = Int
i: Int.type = object scala.Int

scala> i.box(42)
res0: Integer = 42

I am guessing your error has to do with

val ws: Class[_ <: WS.type]

being implemented with:

val ws = WS

That cannot compile, and indeed a Class[...] has no url() method either. You can just type ws to WS.type:

trait WSComponent {
  val ws: WS.type
}

And change the mocking to mock[WS.type].


Edit: the other way below only works if you have control over the WS type (apparently not the case here since it comes from play)

If you really want to avoid the singleton type, you could turn WS into a trait with a singleton implementation, and only refer to the trait in your cake.

trait WS {
  def url(url: String): Request
}

object SingletonWS extends WS {
  def url(url: String) = ??? // actual implementation
}

And in your cake:

trait WSComponent {
  val ws: WS
}

object ApplicationContext extends WSComponent {
  val ws = SingletonWS
}

object TestContext extends WSComponent {
  val ws = mock[WS]
}
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2  
I believe for the OP that WS is coming from the play library. It's defined as an object and does not mix in any traits that represent the operations that the object exposes. That sort of makes is a dead end for mocking with the only solution probably being wrapping and then delegating and then mocking on the wrapper. –  cmbaxter Jun 20 '13 at 19:28
    
cmbaxter is correct. WS does come from play, and it extends only Class. Nevertheless, gourlaysama is correct in that, if I only use WS.type instead of Class[WS.type] (or Class[_ <: WS.type]), everything compiles and the methods are there. Thanks, both! –  Ben Wilhelm Jun 20 '13 at 20:51
    
oh, I hadn't seen the link with the play-framework. Then I guess using WS.type everywhere is the only option. I am guessing mock[WS.type] would work too. –  gourlaysama Jun 20 '13 at 22:00
    
this will compile, but it won't work. mock is from Mockito and it cannot mock finals. the type member on a scala object compiles down to a final class. –  Chris DaMour Feb 20 at 4:31
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You could try defining a trait that contains the calls from WS that you use and then a simple wrapper impl that delegates to WS. Something like this:

trait WSMethods{
  def url(str:String):Request
}

object WSWrapper extends WSMethods{
  def url(str:String) = WS.url(str)
}

Then use it like so in a trait that you mix into classes that need it:

trait WSClient{
  val ws:WSMethods
}

Once you do that it's more mockable. It's a bit cumbersome, but that's the way it's going to be when the object does not mix in a trait that defines its operations. If the people at typesafe had done that with WS then it would be easier to mock. Also, most mock frameworks (probably all) will barf if you try something along the lines:

val m = mock[WS.type]
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