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In Stack Overflow post Checking the object type in C++11, I have the comment:

In C++11 you'll actually want to do virtual ~A() = default; Otherwise, you'll lose the implict move constructors.

What is virtual ~A() = default; for? How come implicit move constructors lost with virtual ~A() {}?

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13  
+1 because you managed to cause wrong answers from 10k+ users. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 20 '13 at 19:42
6  
Note that you can always get the move constructor anyways with the same mechanic: A(A&&) = default; –  Xeo Jun 20 '13 at 20:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 41 down vote accepted

The comment is not correct.

Both:

virtual ~A() = default;

and

virtual ~A() {}

are user declared. And the implicit move members are inhibited if the destructor is user declared.

[dcl.fct.def.default]/p4 discusses user-declared and user-provided special members:

A special member function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration.

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@HowardHinnant: Then in both cases the compiler wouldn't provide a move constructor? –  legends2k Jun 20 '13 at 19:39
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@legends2k: That is correct. –  Howard Hinnant Jun 20 '13 at 19:40
    
@Pixelchemist: I think you're right. Section 8.4.2 Explicitly-defaulted functions and implicitly-declared functions are collectively called defaulted functions, and the implementation shall provide implicit definitions for them. A special member function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration. This is from n3337 i.e. C++11 standard + 1 –  legends2k Jun 20 '13 at 19:43
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I thought that the entire point of defaulted functions was to NOT suppress generation of other members, impact triviality, etc. –  Puppy Jun 20 '13 at 20:07
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@Xeo There are other reasons to have non-user-provided functions as well. E.g. ~A() = default; may be a trivial destructor but ~A() {} cannot be. –  bames53 Jun 20 '13 at 20:22

In this post http://stackoverflow.com/a/17204598/260127, I have the comment:

In C++11 you'll actually want to do virtual ~A() = default; Otherwise, you'll lose the implict move constructors.

The comment is incorrect.

Even defaulted, that destructor is "user-declared" (though note that it is not also "user-provided").

#include <iostream>

struct Helper
{
    Helper() {}
    Helper(const Helper& src) { std::cout << "copy\n"; }
    Helper(Helper&& src)      { std::cout << "move\n"; }
};

struct A
{
    virtual ~A() {}
    Helper h;
};

struct B
{
    virtual ~B() = default;
    Helper h;
};

struct C
{
    Helper h;
};


int main()
{
    {
        A x;
        A y(std::move(x));   // outputs "copy", because no move possible
    }

    {
        B x;
        B y(std::move(x));   // outputs "copy", because still no move possible
    }

    {
        C x;
        C y(std::move(x));   // outputs "move", because no user-declared dtor
    } 
}

Live demo:

+ g++-4.8 -std=c++11 -O2 -Wall -pthread main.cpp
+ ./a.out
copy
copy
move

So you haven't "lost" anything — there was no move functionality there to begin with!

Here is the standard passage that prohibits an implicit move constructor in both cases:

[C++11: 12.8/9]: If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move constructor, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if

  • X does not have a user-declared copy constructor,
  • X does not have a user-declared copy assignment operator,
  • X does not have a user-declared move assignment operator,
  • X does not have a user-declared destructor, and
  • the move constructor would not be implicitly defined as deleted.

Bootnote

It wouldn't hurt if a future version of the standard actually listed the precise meanings of terms such as "user-declared". There is, at least, this:

[C++11: 8.4.2/4]: [..] A special member function is user-provided if it is user-declared and not explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration. [..]

One may assume the distinction here by implication.

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1  
Although I wonder why the standard doesn't allow the implementation to provide a move constructor when none is provided by the user i.e. leaving it undeclared and doing = default; seems the same. –  legends2k Jun 20 '13 at 19:51
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@legends2k: I agree; ideally 12.8/9 could say "user-provided" instead. Probably 12.8/20, too? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 20 '13 at 19:53
    
@legends2k: And, yeah, everybody loves a good testcase. :D –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 20 '13 at 19:54
    
These implicit special member function rules have gotten more complicated in C++11. What does it mean "explicitly defaulted or deleted on its first declaration"? Can there be a subsequent declaration after the first? –  ThomasMcLeod Jun 21 '13 at 1:21
    
@ThomasMcLeod: A definition is also a declaration so, yes... except you can't define a defaulted or deleted special member function. There would be two declarations here: struct A { ~A() = default; }; A::~A() {} except that the definition is illegal. I think it's probably just awkward or over-precise wording. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 21 '13 at 9:11

Instead of providing your own move constructor, if you want the compiler to provide one, it expects that the destructor is the one provided by the compiler too i.e. a trivial destructor.

I guess the rationale behind this is that during move an object's resources are moved to another object leaving the original object in a state where it has no resources in dynamic-storage; but if your class doesn't have any such resources then it can be trivially moved, destroyed, etc. When you declare a non-trivial destructor it's a cue for the compiler that the resources you manage in the class are not something trivial and that you'd mostly have to provide non-trivial move too, so the compiler doesn't provide one.

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4  
+1 for commenting on the reasoning behind this behavior. –  s.bandara Jun 20 '13 at 19:09
1  
Except that it is not the reasoning behind this behaviour, because that is not the behaviour. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 20 '13 at 19:41

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