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Basically I've got a game server in which had the password hash as sha1 and another as md5 for when new users registered an account. I decided to stick with sha1, however I want to be able for my users to change their password which will create them into sha1 from md5.

I've got the below code I've written up but it doesn't seem to work.

Basically, I want it to when they change their password it replaces the md5 with the sha1 hash password.

    <?php
if(isSet($_POST['submit']))
{
$changePW = true;
}
?>

<?php
public function hashed($password)

 {

  return sha1($password . "xCg532%@%gdvf^5DGaa6&*rFTfg^FD4\$OIFThrR_gh(ugf*/");

 }
?>

<?php
if(isset($changePW))
{
    //host, username, password, dbName
    $con=mysqli_connect("localhost","root","password","dbName");

    $username = $_POST['username'];
    $password = $_POST['passwordOld'];
    $passwordNew1 = $_POST['passwordNew1'];
    $passwordNew2 = $_POST['passwordNew2'];

    $passwordHash = md5($password);

// Check connection
if (mysqli_connect_errno())
  {
  echo "Failed to connect to MySQL: " . mysqli_connect_error();
  }

  $cmd = "SELECT COUNT(*) FROM users WHERE username = '" . $username . "' AND password = '" . $passwordHash . "'";
  $result = mysqli_query($con,$cmd);
  $row = mysqli_fetch_row($result);
  if($row[0] == 1)
  {
      if($passwordNew1 == $passwordNew2)
      {
          $newHash = hashed($passwordNew1);
          $cmd = "UPDATE users SET password = '$newHash' WHERE username = '$username'";
          mysqli_query($con,$cmd);
      }
      else{
          $passwordMatch = true;
      }
  }
 else {
      $detailsError = true;
  }

  //$hash = md5($password);
  //mysqli_query($con,"INSERT INTO tutorials_tbl (name, hash) VALUES ('" . $username . "','" . $hash . "')");

mysqli_close($con);
}
?>

<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        .lblLabel{
            width:165px;
            display: inline-block;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<form name="login" method="post" action="change.php">

<fieldset style="width:350px;"><legend>Change Password Form</legend>

<label class="lblLabel">Username</label><input id="name" type="text" name="username" value=""><br />

<label class="lblLabel">Old Password</label><input type="password" name="passwordOld"><br />
<?php
    if(isset($detailsError))
    { ?>
<span style="color: #F00; font-weight: bold;">Username or Password Incorrect</span>
    <?php }
    ?>
<label class="lblLabel">New Password</label><input type="password" name="passwordNew1"><br />

<label class="lblLabel">Repeated New Password</label><input type="password" name="passwordNew2"><br />
<?php
    if(isset($passwordMatch))
    { ?>
<span style="color: #F00; font-weight: bold;">Password's do not match</span>
    <?php }
    ?>
<label class="lblLabel">&nbsp;</label><input id="submit" type="submit" name="submit" value="Change Password"><br />
</fieldset>

</form>

It's calling to change the password under the password column to sha1, in the users table. All current passwords in the users table are md5 and need to be converted into sha1.

Sorry if this doesn't make sense.

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2  
Out of curiousity, why not SHA the MD5'd password? –  ChrisForrence Jun 20 '13 at 19:04
    
Also, did you see this question? –  ChrisForrence Jun 20 '13 at 19:05
    
I'm not familiar with password hashing. I have 1,000+ registered users, all with MD5 passwords that need to be switched into SHA1 so they can login successfully. –  user2506542 Jun 20 '13 at 19:06
    
Basically, what you'd be doing is, one time only, going through each user and SHA-hashing their password. This creates a SHA-hash of the password. When you do your login check, you'd MD5-hash the given password, SHA-hash that result, then check that against your user table. It would be minimal initial work for you, and it would be a seamless transition for your users (they wouldn't have to change their password, you wouldn't have to maintain two records of their password, etc.) –  ChrisForrence Jun 20 '13 at 19:08
1  
How large is your password field in the database? It may be too small, which would cause the password to truncate, causing all attempts to validate against the database to fail. –  ChrisForrence Jun 20 '13 at 19:45
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2 Answers 2

Every password-storing-system must have the option to switch to a better hash algorithm, your problem is not a one-time migration problem. Good password hash algorithms like BCrypt have a cost factor, from time to time you have to increase this cost factor (because of faster hardware), then you need the exact same procedure as you need for the migration.

That leads to your biggest problem, SHA-1 is not appropriate to hash passwords, especially if it is salted with a constant salt. It is ways too fast and makes it easy to brute-force (3 Giga hashes per second with common hardware in 2013). That's why one should use a slow key-derivation function like BCrypt. If you take the effort to migrate your hashes, then better switch straight to BCrypt.

The usual way to switch to a better hash algorithm is to wait until the user logs in the next time (in contrast to your example, the user doesn't need to change the password then). Then you take this steps:

  1. First try to verify the entered password with the new algorithm. New passwords and already converted passwords will not take longer for verification then.
  2. If it does not match, compare it with the old hash algorithm.
  3. Should the old hash value match, then you can calculate and store the new hash, since you know the password then.

This system can be extended to more than one migration. Just make sure that you first check for the newest algorithm, and afterwards for older algorithms. Then the login will take longer only the next time the user logs in, and new users are not affected by backwards compatibility issues.

That leaves the question of how to use BCrypt. PHP 5.5 will have it's own functions password_hash() and password_verify() ready. I recommend to use this excellent api, or it's compatibility pack for earlier PHP versions. The usage is very straightforward:

// Hash a new password for storing in the database.
// The function automatically generates a cryptographically safe salt.
$hashToStoreInDb = password_hash($password, PASSWORD_BCRYPT);

// Check if the hash of the entered login password, matches the stored hash.
// The salt and the cost factor will be extracted from $existingHashFromDb.
$isPasswordCorrect = password_verify($password, $existingHashFromDb);

➽ Keep in mind, that you need a database field with 60 characters in length, to store such hash-values.

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As explained in my comment, what you'd want to do to make the transition in password storage as smooth as possible for the user is to hash everyone's password against SHA1 while leaving it MD5-hashed. Then, in your normal login logic, you'd MD5-hash the password, then SHA1-hash that.

As an aside, I'd use SHA2 for a hashing algorithm (just as fast, more secure, etc.)

<?php
public function hashSpecial($password)
{
    return sha1($password . "xCg532%@%gdvf^5DGaa6&*rFTfg^FD4\$OIFThrR_gh(ugf*/");
}

public function hashForLogin($password)
{
    return sha1(md5($password) 
        . "xCg532%@%gdvf^5DGaa6&*rFTfg^FD4\$OIFThrR_gh(ugf*/");
}

public function hashAllPasswords()
{
    $con = mysqli_connect("localhost", "root", "password", "dbName");

    $query = 'SELECT username, password FROM users';
    if(mysqli_connect_errno() > 0)
    {
        echo 'Failed to connect to database.';
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        $result = mysqli_query($con, $query);
        while(($row = mysqli_fetch_row($result)) != null)
        {
            $query = 'UPDATE users SET password=\'' 
                 . hashSpecial($row['password']) . '\' WHERE username=\''
                 . $row['username'] . '\'';
            $r2 = mysqli_query($con, $query);
        }
    }
}
?>
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