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This seems like it should be pretty straightforward. I have my class:

class Simple
{
public:
    LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
         ...
    }
};

and my WinMain:

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR commandLine, int cmdShow)
{
    Simple *simple = new Simple();
    ...

    wndClass.lpfnWndProc = simple->WndProc;
    ...
 }

When I try though, I get:

error C2440: '=' :cannot convert from 'LRESULT (__stdcall Simple::* )(HWND,UINT,WPARAM,LPARAM)' to 'WNDPROC'

Is there any reason I can't have my WndProc in a class? Seems like that would be really useful.

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2  
Why do you think having the WindowProc function as a member is really useful? What instance of the class would this member function operate on? –  Praetorian Jun 20 '13 at 19:15
    
That's a really bad way to use new. Use stack allocation. –  chris Jun 20 '13 at 19:15
    
@chris. I didn't initially. I just thought maybe if it was on the heap, that would fix it. Debug-by-prayer approach. –  sircodesalot Jun 20 '13 at 19:16
    
@Praetorian, I get what you're saying. Since the solution seems to be 'make it static' I think that makes sense. ALSO, I'm totally new to win32. –  sircodesalot Jun 20 '13 at 19:17
    
I would stay away from it until you have a firm grasp of the language. –  chris Jun 20 '13 at 19:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

C++ treats member functions and free functions as different - member functions need to have access to a this pointer, and typically that's passed in as a hidden first parameter. Consequently, an n-argument member function would be most similar to an (n+1)-argument free function, which means that code trying to call your WndProc would pass in the wrong number of arguments.

You can, however, declare WndProc as a static member function, which eliminates the this pointer. This code should work:

class Simple
{
public:
    static LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
         ...
    }
};

int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, LPSTR commandLine, int cmdShow)
{
    Simple *simple = new Simple();
    ...

    wndClass.lpfnWndProc = simple->WndProc;
    ...
 }

Of course, this means you can't directly access the fields of the class. You could get around this by embedding a pointer to the class into the extra bytes reserved for each window instance, perhaps by using SetWindowLongPtr. Once you've done that, you can recover the receiver object pointer by writing something like this:

class Simple
{
public:
    static LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
         Simple* me = static_cast<Simple*>(GetWindowLongPtr(hwnd, GWLP_USERDATA));
         if (me) return me->realWndProc(hwnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
         return DefWindowProc(hwnd, msg, wParam, lParam);
    }
private:
    LRESULT CALLBACK realWndProc(HWND hwnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
    {
         // Yay!  I'm a member function!
    }
};

Hope this helps!

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A pointer to a member function has an implicit first parameter of this, and so has a different signiture than a pointer to a 'free' function. See http://www.parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/fnptr-vs-memfnptr-types.html

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