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I am randomly populating a grid where the cartesian coordinates are normalized from 0 to 100 (100x100x100 grid) and the "intensity" of each data point within is normalized from 0 to 256. Here is an excerpt from my code in perl:

open(FILE,$file);
while(sysread(FILE,$data,16)) {
    @row=unpack("f>4",$data);   # input file is binary so I had to convert here
    $x=int((($row[0] - $xmin)/($xmax - $xmin)*10) + 0.5); # max and min variables
    $y=int((($row[1] - $ymin)/($ymax - $ymin)*10) + 0.5); # are previously defined
    $z=int((($row[2] - $zmin)/($zmax - $zmin)*10) + 0.5);
    $i=int(($row[3]/62*256) + 0.5);
    $i=255 if ($i>255);

    $out[$x][$y][$z]=$i;   # simply assigns an intensity for each data
                           # point (in random order), only 1 point can be
                           # added to each 1x1x1 cell
}

Some points are too close together and are being placed in the same 1x1x1 cell. When this happens, each intensity added overwrites the previous one. How can I count the number of times that more than one point is placed in a cell?

Thanks in advance!

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4  
oh thanks, sorry I am new here – Izaak Williamson Jun 20 '13 at 20:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this pretty easily with another hash, just join all of your keys ($x,$y,$z) together into a single key and set the hash value to true whenever you insert a value.

my %visited_points; 

open(FILE,$file);
while(sysread(FILE,$data,16)) {
    @row=unpack("f>4",$data);   # input file is binary so I had to convert here
    $x=int((($row[0] - $xmin)/($xmax - $xmin)*10) + 0.5); # max and min variables
    $y=int((($row[1] - $ymin)/($ymax - $ymin)*10) + 0.5); # are
    $z=int((($row[2] - $zmin)/($zmax - $zmin)*10) + 0.5);
    $i=int(($row[3]/62*256) + 0.5);
    $i=255 if ($i>255);

    my $key = "$x$y$z";
    # check if something already occupies this cell
    if( exists( $visited_points{$key} ) ) {
        # take some other action
    }

    $out[$x][$y][$z]=$i;   # simply assigns an intensity for each data
                           # point (in random order), only 1 point can be
                           # added to each 1x1x1 cell

    # mark that there is something in this cell
    $visited_points{$key} = 1;
}

If you wanted to count you count easily just increment the value as well.

share|improve this answer
1  
That if-loop seemed to work great, thank you! I don't really understand what the "$visited_points{$key} = 1;" line is doing, though. – Izaak Williamson Jun 20 '13 at 20:53
2  
What happens if two points are ($x,$y,$z)=(11,1,1) and ($x,$y,$z)=(1,11,1) ? Might try a key like $x:$y:$z. – mob Jun 20 '13 at 20:53
    
@IzaakWilliamson Well there are any languages symbols in Perl for true and false, so 1 here is true and 0 is false. – Hunter McMillen Jun 20 '13 at 20:54
    
@mob That would happen I suppose ( and will ) since it is 100 x 100 x 100; you could easily add a separator to make the values unique. 11.1.1 vs 1.11.1. – Hunter McMillen Jun 20 '13 at 20:55
1  
@mob from what I can tell, the separators aren't making a difference with this data set but other sets may run into problems if I don't include them – Izaak Williamson Jun 20 '13 at 22:05

To make it more hpc(high performance computing)-friendly, I found that instead of the $key and if-loop, simply putting in a count like this works too.

open(FILE,$file);
while(sysread(FILE,$data,16)) {
    @row=unpack("f>4",$data);   # input file is binary so I had to convert here
    $x=int((($row[0] - $xmin)/($xmax - $xmin)*10) + 0.5); # max and min variables
    $y=int((($row[1] - $ymin)/($ymax - $ymin)*10) + 0.5); # are previously defined
    $z=int((($row[2] - $zmin)/($zmax - $zmin)*10) + 0.5);
    $i=int(($row[3]/62*256) + 0.5);
    $i=255 if ($i>255);

    $count[$x][$y][$z]+=1;

    $out[$x][$y][$z]=$i;   # simply assigns an intensity for each data
                           # point (in random order), only 1 point can be
                           # added to each 1x1x1 cell
}

Then, if $count[$x][$y][$z] is greater than 1, it means more than one point was put in that bin. If it equals 1, only one point was put there, and if it is less than one, then the bin is empty.

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Another version of Hunter's solution replaces a hash (with encoded key); with an array (with an encoded index).

Pros: possibly very slightly improving performance. More likely than not, not by a great enough margin to matter, in all honesty, but do your own benchmarking to be sure.

Cons: sacrifice of memory. If your grid is populated sparsely - say 1000 points out of 1 million - you would store 1000 elements in a hash but 1,000,000 elements in the array.

# my @visited_points;

my $key = $x * 10000 + $y * 100 + $z;

# Mark as visited
$visited_points[$key]++;

# Check if visited:
if (defined $visited_points[$key]) {
    # Bail out?
}

# Check how many times visited?
# Use trinary ?: operator to gracefully convert undef to 0
my $count = $visited_points[$key] ? $visited_points[$key] : 0;
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