Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get a bit into Typed Racket, but I'm having some trouble getting an (admittedly rather constructed) experiment to work.

This is what I originally had:

#lang typed/racket

(: generate-list
   (All (A)
   ((A -> A) (Integer -> A) Integer -> (Listof A))))

(define (generate-list function location-function num-items)
  (let: loop : (Listof A)
    ((count : Integer 0)
     (result : (Listof A) (list)))
    (if (>= count num-items)
        (reverse result)
        (loop (+ count 1)
              (cons (function (location-function count)) result)))))

; ---------------------------------
(: f (Number -> Number))
(define (f x) (* x x))

(: locf (Integer -> Number))
(define (locf x) x)
; ---------------------------------

(displayln (generate-list f locf 10))

Which has the output:

(0 1 4 9 16 25 36 49 64 81)

Which is nice. Then I figured I could make this a bit better documented by giving the function and location-function a defined type:

#lang typed/racket

(define-type (ListGenFunction A) (A -> A))
(define-type (ListGenLocFunction A) (Integer -> A))

(: generate-list
   (All (A)
        (ListGenFunction ListGenLocFunction Integer -> (Listof A))))

(define (generate-list function location-function num-items)
  (let: loop : (Listof A)
    ((count : Integer 0)
     (result : (Listof A) (list)))
    (if (>= count num-items)
        (reverse result)
        (loop (+ count 1)
              (cons (function (location-function count)) result)))))

; ----------- Numbers! ------------
(: f ListGenFunction)
(define (f x) (* x x))

(: locf ListGenLocFunction)
(define (locf x) x)
; ---------------------------------

(displayln (generate-list f locf 10))

Now here's where the problems start (and I really hope some experienced Typed Racketeers aren't facepalming too hard right now). For one, the type checker gives me an error on the line where I define f. The message is rather lengthy, but it's basically: "Type Checker: No function domains matched in function application: Types: ... in: (* x x)". I thought I defined a type that has one parameter of a generic type A that returns a generic type A? Wouldn't (* x x) work? Or is there some need to "tag" the type? (Like in C++-like languages where it's list<int> for example)

On top of that: Now my type-definition for the function generate-list has a return type of "(Listof A)". But that A is not at all declared to be the same A that the parameters with the types ListGenFunction and ListGenLocFunction expect. I kind of want to make that connection, however, so that anyone who uses that function can be sure that the types of his provided functions match the type of the returning list items.

How do I do this correctly?

PS: I'm not sure if I described my intention in the last paragraph so that anyone can understand it. But if you take some generic pseudo-C++-like code, I want to get the following:

list<T> generate-list(LGF<T> f, LGLF<T> locf, int count) { ... }

So that all T's are exactly the same.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two problems here, both of which stem from the same confusion. You're using a generic type, ListGenFunction, without telling Typed Racket (or the reader of your program) what particular type you're using it with.

For example, f isn't an arbitrary ListGenFunction, it's a ListGenFunction that works specifically on numbers. So you should write:

(: f (ListGenFunction Integer))

and

(: locf (ListGenLocFunction Integer))

Similarly, you should give generate-list a type like this:

(: generate-list
   (All (A)
     ((ListGenFunction A) (ListGenLocFunction A) Integer -> (Listof A))))

This is just like how you explicitly say that you're producing a (Listof A), not just a Listof.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, so I can (and have to) tag the types! Thanks for clearing that up! Now the program executes and produces the correct result. Still, DrRacket (Windows, version 5.3.3) shows an error "Type Checker: Error in macro expansion -- not a valid type: (A) in: (define-type (ListGenFunction A) (A -> A))". Do you have an idea why this error is shown? Is it a false positive since the program essentially works fine? –  cronotk Jun 21 '13 at 15:51
    
Okay, version 5.2.1 (in Debian) doesn't have that problem. I guess it's either a small bug in 5.3.x or the Windows version in general. –  cronotk Jun 21 '13 at 16:28
    
Does this error appear when you press "Run"? Or somewhere else? –  Sam Tobin-Hochstadt Jun 21 '13 at 20:33
    
Oh sorry, I should have been more specific: the error is marked in the definitions window and displayed in the status bar. It appears "on its own". I mean I do not have to execute the program, it just comes up. There is no error at all when running the program and everything is fine. –  cronotk Jun 21 '13 at 22:50
    
I suspect that you are seeing stale output from the background syntax checker in DrRacket. If you can run the program using the "Run" button, it means it has type-checked successfully (it will not execute otherwise). –  Asumu Takikawa Jun 22 '13 at 1:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.