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How can I extract a substring which is composed of the rightmost six letters from another string?

Ex: my string is "PER 343573". Now I want to extract only "343573".

How can I do this?

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You could use the source code for the VB.NET Right method. You'd need to convert to C# first: referencesource.microsoft.com/#Microsoft.VisualBasic/… Convert to C# using converter.telerik.com –  D-Money May 13 '14 at 20:17
    
but the VB code relies on the c# Substring function in strings.sc –  Our Man In Bananas Dec 11 '14 at 15:14
    
This is not really a very good way to do it, but if you're in a pinch, you can add a reference to Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll, and use the Right method. It is not an extension method. You have to use it like this: string endOfString = Strings.Right(wholeString, 6); –  Alan McBee Jan 22 at 3:50

12 Answers 12

up vote 43 down vote accepted
string SubString = MyString.Substring(MyString.Length-6);
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11  
This aproach does not work correctly if the string is not as long as the number of characters required. –  Stevo3000 Nov 12 '09 at 13:59
1  
also the question is "right most n letters" yours will only ever work if you need to extract the 6. A bit pernickity, but a fact all the same :) –  James Nov 12 '09 at 14:05
    
Depending on what exactly the OP wants one might also throw regular expressions at this. If s?he only wants the number at the end of the string, that's definitely the most painless solution, especially when the number of digits may vary in some later software upgrade. –  Joey Nov 12 '09 at 14:10
1  
@Johannes Rössel - I'm a big fan of regular expressions (see my answers), but I'd never recomend them for a simple situation such as this. Any of the answers that use a function wrapper are better suited to code maintanance than a regular expression. An extension method (or standard function if .NET 2.0) is the best solution. –  Stevo3000 Nov 12 '09 at 14:57
    
Not right if lenght is not as desired, split works better. –  Mahdi Tahsildari Jul 3 '13 at 13:02

Write an extension method to express the Right(n); function. The function should deal with null or empty strings returning an empty string, strings shorter than the max length returning the original string and strings longer than the max length returning the max length of rightmost characters.

public static string Right(this string sValue, int iMaxLength)
{
  //Check if the value is valid
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(sValue))
  {
    //Set valid empty string as string could be null
    sValue = string.Empty;
  }
  else if (sValue.Length > iMaxLength)
  {
    //Make the string no longer than the max length
    sValue = sValue.Substring(sValue.Length - iMaxLength, iMaxLength);
  }

  //Return the string
  return sValue;
}
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Start index cannot be less than 0 either. –  James Nov 12 '09 at 14:06
1  
@James - It won't be as sValue.Length > iMaxLength before a substring is called! –  Stevo3000 Nov 12 '09 at 14:54
1  
Great answer, but it was a bit of a double-take to see Hungarian notation in C# code. –  Jerad Rose Jul 10 '14 at 15:46
    
@JeradRose - I work in a project where the code base evolved from a VB3 application (most of this is VB.NET) so there are some remnants. –  Stevo3000 Jul 14 '14 at 15:22
1  
@Jalle, VB.NET has Left, Right and Mid as top-level functions, plus many other helpful things that are not part of C#. Not sure why, as many of them are decent functions. –  ingredient_15939 Aug 2 '14 at 3:52

Probably nicer to use an extension method:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static string Right(this string str, int length)
    {
        return str.Substring(str.Length - length, length);
    }
}

Usage

string myStr = "ABCDEPER 343573";
string subStr = myStr.Right(6);
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What if str is null? –  Stevo3000 Nov 13 '09 at 9:11
7  
Then it would throw a NullReferenceException just like it would if you tried to use any method on a null string... –  James Nov 13 '09 at 9:16

MSDN

String mystr = "PER 343573";
String number = mystr.Substring(mystr.Length-6);

EDIT: too slow...

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using System;

public static class DataTypeExtensions
{
    #region Methods

    public static string Left(this string str, int length)
    {
        str = (str ?? string.Empty);
        return str.Substring(0, Math.Min(length, str.Length));
    }

    public static string Right(this string str, int length)
    {
        str = (str ?? string.Empty);
        return (str.Length >= length)
            ? str.Substring(str.Length - length, length)
            : str;
    }

    #endregion
}

Shouldn't error, returns nulls as empty string, returns trimmed or base values. Use it like "testx".Left(4) or str.Right(12);

share|improve this answer

Use this:

String text = "PER 343573";
String numbers = text;
if (text.Length > 6)
{
    numbers = text.Substring(text.Length - 6);
}
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What if text is null? –  Stevo3000 Nov 13 '09 at 8:33

This isn't exactly what you are asking for, but just looking at the example, it appears that you are looking for the numeric section of the string.

If this is always the case, then a good way to do it would be using a regular expression.

var regex= new Regex("\n+");
string numberString = regex.Match(page).Value;
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+1 for a different aproach. –  Stevo3000 Nov 12 '09 at 14:57
    
-1 regular expressions are a little overkill for something like this, especially when there are already built in methods for doing it. –  James Nov 13 '09 at 9:17
1  
I'm not arguing for using this method if you really do only need the last 6, but if your goal is to extract a number (such as an id) that may change to 5 or 7 digits at some point in the future, this is a better way. –  chills42 Nov 13 '09 at 13:24

Guessing at your requirements but the following regular expression will yield only on 6 alphanumerics before the end of the string and no match otherwise.

string result = Regex.Match("PER 343573", @"[a-zA-Z\d]{6}$").Value;
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Does this solution not reasonably meet the vague requirements? If not, please explain your down voting. –  Wade Nov 13 '09 at 15:42

if you are not sure of the length of your string, but you are sure of the words count (always 2 words in this case, like 'xxx yyyyyy') you'd better use split.

string Result = "PER 343573".Split(" ")[1];

this always returns the second word of your string.

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Here's the solution I use... It checks that the input string's length isn't lower than the asked length. The solutions I see posted above don't take this into account unfortunately - which can lead to crashes.

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the last x-<paramref name="amount"/> of characters from the given string.
    /// If the given string's length is smaller than the requested <see cref="amount"/> the full string is returned.
    /// If the given <paramref name="amount"/> is negative, an empty string will be returned.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="string">The string from which to extract the last x-<paramref name="amount"/> of characters.</param>
    /// <param name="amount">The amount of characters to return.</param>
    /// <returns>The last x-<paramref name="amount"/> of characters from the given string.</returns>
    public static string GetLast(this string @string, int amount)
    {
        if (@string == null) {
            return @string;
        }

        if (amount < 0) {
            return String.Empty;
        }

        if (amount >= @string.Length) {
            return @string;
        } else {
            return @string.Substring(@string.Length - amount);
        }
    }
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Use this:

string mystr = "PER 343573"; int number = Convert.ToInt32(mystr.Replace("PER ",""));

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Without resorting to the bit converter and bit shifting (need to be sure of encoding) this is fastest method I use as an extension method 'Right'.

string myString = "123456789123456789";

if (myString > 6)
{

        char[] cString = myString.ToCharArray();
        Array.Reverse(myString);
        Array.Resize(ref myString, 6);
        Array.Reverse(myString);
        string val = new string(myString);
}
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1  
Array.Reverse takes an array, not a string, and if (myString.length > 6). Syntax errors aside, why would this be the fastest method? Surely just using substring would be a better way, it wouldn't require all this copying of arrays. –  1800 INFORMATION Dec 19 '13 at 2:54

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