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>>> if 5==5:
print '5'
else: print 'cat'

File "<pyshell#2>", line 3
else: print 'cat'
                ^
 IndentationError: unindent does not match any outer indentation level

No matter what the indent is, it still doesn't work. Even if I try to put the print cat statement on the next line it gives me syntax error. Why is this?

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closed as too localized by Ben, Ben Blank, Jared, talonmies, hjpotter92 Jun 20 '13 at 22:07

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want your code to look like this:

if 5 == 5:
    print '5'
else:
    print 'cat'

Why? Because Python uses indentation like other languages use brackets: it determines the grouping of statements. Dive Into Python has an excellent explanation of how this works:

Python uses carriage returns to separate statements and a colon and indentation to separate code blocks. C++ and Java use semicolons to separate statements and curly braces to separate code blocks.

The reference manual also describes how this works at a lower level:

Leading whitespace (spaces and tabs) at the beginning of a logical line is used to compute the indentation level of the line, which in turn is used to determine the grouping of statements.

...

First, tabs are replaced (from left to right) by one to eight spaces such that the total number of characters up to and including the replacement is a multiple of eight (this is intended to be the same rule as used by Unix). The total number of spaces preceding the first non-blank character then determines the line’s indentation.

Stylistically, you want to use 4 spaces to indicate a level of indentation. This is defined in PEP 8. This will ensure everyone sees the same thing, no matter what IDE they're using. Note that you should never mix tabs and spaces, as it becomes very easy to unwittingly break code (consider not all editors show tabs as the same size).

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thanks. It worked –  user2506833 Jun 20 '13 at 21:13

Use proper indentation in python otherwise you'll get such errors.

Use 4 spaces for indentation.

if 5 == 5:
    print '5'
else:
    print 'cat'

From docs:

Leading whitespace (spaces and tabs) at the beginning of a logical line is used to compute the indentation level of the line, which in turn is used to determine the grouping of statements.

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1  
PEP8: Always surround these binary operators with a single space on either side: assignment (=), augmented assignment (+=, -= etc.), comparisons (==, <, >, !=, <>, <=, >=, in, not in, is, is not), Booleans (and, or, not) –  Sam Bruns Jun 20 '13 at 20:51

Don't know what your code is going to do, but note that it is impossible to print 'cat' out there. Therefore, the else statement is completely useless. Why? The 5==5 condition produces always True, so no matter what, '5' is always printed.

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