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Ok, so I have a table that contains a bunch of (relatively) normal distributions. For the sake of brevity, there are 3 fields. The foreign key, the X-value, and the Y-Value. We'll call the x and y FieldX and FieldY for simplicity, and the key SampleID.

So I would have like 6000 records with the same SampleID which would be a single normal distribution, and I have about 20 distributions (so 120k records overall, give or take).

Now, what I need to do is to normalize the data to the so-called "Standard Normal" form, meaning that the Max peaks of them all line up. In Excel, this is no problem, but I have to do it with SQL. First I put together a series of 3 stacked queries that solved this:

Query1) Solves for Max(FieldY) group by SampleID as MaxFieldY (20 results)

Query2) Solves for FieldX where FieldY == MaxFieldY.Query1 as MaxFieldX group by SampleID (20 Results)

Query3) Solves for FieldX-MaxFieldX + 100,000 as AdjFieldX group by AdjFieldX (6k * 20 results)

This puts all of the normal distributions centered around 100,000 (I can't actually center around 0 like you would in true standard normal due to these curves being more log-normal and being displayed on log scale).

This works. But its 3-stacked queries and I have to do this for like 6 kinds of curves. That's 18 static/stacked queries. I've put together a massive database without have to use a single static query, and I plan on keeping it that way. Seeing a query on the left side of my screen is a huge mark of shame to me, I will not accept 18!

So I needed to do this in a single query. I've messed around with subqueries before, at one point I did a really ugly numerical integration with some subqueries. Lots of fun. Anyways, after a surprisingly few amount of errors I came up with the following:

SELECT
  TData.SampleID,
  TData.FieldY,
  (TData.FieldX - qMaxAdj.MaxFieldX+100000) AS Adj_FieldX
FROM 
(
  SELECT
    qMax.SampleID,
    TData.FieldX AS MaxFieldX,
    TData.FieldY 
  FROM 
  (
    SELECT
      TDataDupe.SampleID,
      max(TDataDupe.FieldY) AS MaxofFieldY
    FROM TData AS TDataDupe 
    GROUP BY TDataDupe.SampleID
  ) AS qMax 
  LEFT JOIN TData ON qMax.SampleID = TData.SampleID
  WHERE ((TData.FieldY)= qMax.MaxOfFieldY))
) AS qMaxAdj 
LEFT JOIN TData ON qMaxAdj.SampleID = TData.SampleID;

Ok. So yeah. That's a face only a mother could love. You have a couple queries at play. qMax which is finding the Max of Field Y. This is then joined back to qMaxAdj which determines the FieldX value at FieldY max, then finally you normalize along the x.

This works (not entirely sure why but it does) and so far the performance isn't bad. But it is really ugly, and I've heard bad things about nesting subqueries. Moreover, I have no real training writing SQL and I am pretty sure I've screwed this up somewhere, for instance I don't know why I got away without using an Alias for TData in one of the nested Joins (just noticed this).

What kills me is that this is such a simple idea. I just need to adjust the X values by the X Value at Max(Y). There has to be a better way. And if there isn't a better way, is there a cleaner way to write these subqueries? Or are there things I need to look out for performance wise?

So here I am, a self trained SQL hack hoping to find a better way to greener fields. Any ideas Stack Overflow Kenobe? You're my only hope.

(oh yeah this is MS Access 2010, so Jet engine I think)

share|improve this question
    
Providing small sample of the data you've got and how you want to adjust it might be helpful, I read through it and think I understand what you're after, but some data is worth a thousand words. –  Goat CO Jun 20 '13 at 21:49
    
Really the best way to describe it is that I have some data of some normal curves and I want switch them to a Standard Normal form. This is usually done by the mean of the distribution, but since these aren't really normal I need to do it by the Mode (the max point of the population). I need to shift the x-variable of the curves by an amount equal to the x-value at the max(y-variable). –  user2125055 Jun 21 '13 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

The query to find MAX(FieldY) is very straightforward

SELECT SampleID, MAX(FieldY) AS MaxofFieldY
FROM TData 
GROUP BY SampleID

The query to find the corresponding FieldX value for each SampleID is

SELECT t1.SampleID, MAX(t1.FieldX) AS MaxofFieldX
FROM 
    TData t1
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT SampleID, MAX(FieldY) AS MaxofFieldY
        FROM TData 
        GROUP BY SampleID
    ) t2
        ON t1.FieldY=t2.MaxofFieldY
GROUP BY t1.SampleID

Now, the query to "normalize" the data would be

SELECT 
    t3.SampleID, 
    t3.FieldY,
    (t3.FieldX - t4.MaxofFieldX + 100000) AS Adj_FieldX
FROM
    TData t3
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT t1.SampleID, MAX(t1.FieldX) AS MaxofFieldX
        FROM 
            TData t1
            INNER JOIN
            (
                SELECT SampleID, MAX(FieldY) AS MaxofFieldY
                FROM TData 
                GROUP BY SampleID
            ) t2
                ON t1.FieldY=t2.MaxofFieldY
        GROUP BY t1.SampleID
    ) t4
        ON t3.SampleID=t4.SampleID

Notice that each step simply incorporates the query from the previous step as a derived table (aliased as t2 and t4, respectively).

share|improve this answer
    
So what's the difference between the Inner Joins and the subqueries? Are inner joins just cleaner? I guess you're also avoiding those Left Joins as well with this. –  user2125055 Jun 21 '13 at 20:05
    
@user2125055 I've been told that joining to a derived table is more efficient than using subqueries, but that wasn't really the reason I posted my answer. I just built up the solution step-by-step and the final result looked a bit "tidier" than what you had. (I also didn't purposely avoid any outer joins, it just turned out that I didn't seem to need them.) –  Gord Thompson Jun 21 '13 at 20:19

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