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How do I Write C# code that will allow to compile the following code :

var date = 8.September(2013); // Generates a DateTime for the 8th of September 2013
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7  
I wouldn't want to code like that. However, I think it's a interesting concept - so hopefully the title changes will get some (non-negative) votes. –  user2246674 Jun 20 '13 at 21:30
3  
why all the downvoting? –  Keith Nicholas Jun 20 '13 at 21:32
4  
I downvoted, not because the suggested fluent interface is so bad, but because the question was asked in a brusque manner without context, previous research or effort. –  Avner Shahar-Kashtan Jun 20 '13 at 21:32
7  
@user414076: How would you have researched this? Without any knowledge of extension methods, how would you know what to look for? –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '13 at 21:33
3  
+1 With new title I think this question (and especially answers) provide good information on the topic for future readers. –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 20 '13 at 21:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can use an extension method:

public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static DateTime September(this int day, int year)
    {
        return new DateTime(year, 9, day);
    }
}

However, this is generally bad practice, and I'd recommend against this kind of thing, especially for something as trivial as this—is new DateTime(2013, 9, 8) really so much more difficult than 8.September(2013)? There may be times where this kind of trick can be useful or fun for practice, but it should be used sparingly.

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3  
Why is this downvoted? It answers the question perfectly. +1. –  alexn Jun 20 '13 at 21:31
2  
Incorrect month for September –  Sparko Jun 20 '13 at 21:31
4  
@Sparko where do you live? –  alexn Jun 20 '13 at 21:32
3  
@Sparko - This isn't javascript. –  Martin Smith Jun 20 '13 at 21:33
2  
@Sparko I admit, I fat-fingered this when I was first typing it up (thinking 2nd parameter, ended up typing 2), but I corrected it immediately. –  p.s.w.g Jun 20 '13 at 21:36

I would recommend against this, as it strikes me as very poor style. That said, if you really want to do this statically, you would need to define twelve different extension methods (one for each month name) like so:

public static class DateConstructionExtensions
{
    public static DateTime January(this int day, int year)
    {
        return new DateTime(year, /* month: */1, day);
    }

    // equivalent methods for February, March, etc...
}
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8  
I've actually found this to be very usable when writing tests - they end up being very easy to read. I wouldn't use it for non-test code though. –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '13 at 21:32
1  
Fair enough, Jon :). As long as it isn't polluting the public namespaces. –  Mike Strobel Jun 20 '13 at 21:36
1  
Oh absolutely - I would only put it in a namespace specifically for "making test data easier to read" extension methods. (I'd also make it return a Noda Time LocalDate of course ;) –  Jon Skeet Jun 20 '13 at 21:37
2  
I cannot describe how tempted I am to start using this. –  Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Jun 20 '13 at 21:38
3  
Oh lord, what have we done?! ಠ_ಠ –  Mike Strobel Jun 20 '13 at 21:39

You could do this via extensions:

public static DateTime September(this int day, int year) {
    return new DateTime(year, 9, day);
}

Of course, you'd need 12 such extensions, one for each month.

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I think you can have the implementation like this:

public partial interface IMonth {
    int Number {
        get;
    }
}

public partial class February: IMonth {
    public int Number {
        get {
            return 2;
        }
    }
}

public static partial class Extensions {
    public static DateTime OfMonth<T>(this int day, int year) 
            where T: IMonth, new() {
        var month=new T();
        var daysInMonth=DateTime.DaysInMonth(year, month.Number);

        if(1>day||day>daysInMonth)
            throw new ArgumentException();

        return new DateTime(year, month.Number, day);
    }
}

For the reason I declare months as classes, is because months might have different names in different cultures. You might want to provide different aliases for them.

Then, for the reason there's IMonth, is a contract that months must implement it. The extension method has the constraint new() is for avoiding IMonth itself or an abstract class be used.

This implementation also checks for the valid day number.

And you can assign the variable date as:

var date=(28).OfMonth<February>(2013);

Make sense?

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2  
IMonth I have seen it all.. –  Thomas Jun 21 '13 at 1:53

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