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I'm working on a viewer to display xml log files as html using xslt. Everything is going fine exception my localization. The resulting HTML file has a 'ó' where some double byte characters should be. I can't figure out what I am doing wrong.

Here is a a stripped down XSLT file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
xmlns:fn="http://www.w3.org/2005/02/xpath-functions">

  <xsl:output method="html" version="4.0" encoding="utf-8" indent="yes"/>

  <xsl:variable name="language" select="nbklog/@language" />  
  <xsl:variable name="dictionaryName">
    dictionary_<xsl:value-of select="$language"/>.xml
  </xsl:variable>
  <xsl:variable name="dictionary" select="document($dictionaryName)" />

  <xsl:template match="/nbklog">
    <html>
      <body>          
        <h2>       
          <xsl:value-of select="$dictionary//String[@Key=$jobType]" /> 
        </h2>
      </body>
    </html>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Here is a dictionary xml file used for localization:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
  <Dictionary xml:lang="es-ES">
    <String Key="Application">
      Applicación
    </String>
  </Dictionary>

Here is an example xml file to be transformed:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<nbklog id="51b654d4" jobType="backup" language="es-ES" version="1.0">
    <deviceName>c:\</deviceName>
    ....
</nbklog>

I'm executing the transformation the following c# code:

 string theOutputHtml;

 using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream()) {
     using (XmlTextWriter writer = new XmlTextWriter(ms, Encoding.UTF8)) {

         XPathDocument theDocument = new XPathDocument(inXmlFilename);

         // Load the style sheet and run the transformation.
         XslCompiledTransform theXslTrasform = new XslCompiledTransform();
         theXslTrasform.Load(inXsltFilename, XsltSettings.TrustedXslt, null);
         theXslTrasform.Transform(theDocument, writer);

         ms.Position = 0;

         using (StreamReader theReader = new StreamReader(ms)) {
             theOutputHtml = theReader.ReadToEnd();
         }
     }
 }

The content of theOutputHtml will have a 'ó' instead of the 'ó'.

EDIT:

Adding this between the and tags in the html string solved my problem:

 <meta http-equiv='Content-Type' content='text/html;charset=UTF-8'>
share|improve this question
2  
In other words, the answers that said the encoding was wrong were correct, but they identified the wrong encoding. The problem was that you were serving UTF-8 output without configuring your HTML server to label it as such, so the browser was trying to read the UTF-8 data as ISO 8859-1. –  C. M. Sperberg-McQueen Jun 21 '13 at 0:07
    
it was a two place fudging on my part. First was as suggested by the provided answers (fixed seconds after I posted the question), second was as explained by my edit and your comment. –  Dan Vogel Jun 21 '13 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change new XmlTextWriter(ms, Encoding.ASCII) to new XmlTextWriter(ms, Encoding.UTF8)

Update:

Another possible issue is that although your XML files have an encoding="utf-8" declaration, perhaps the files aren't actually saved with that encoding. Check that all of your XML files' encodings match their declared encodings. Personally, I prefer doing away with declaring the encoding so that it can be automatically be detected instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick response. As soon as I submitted the question I found that. I edited the post. When changed to Encoding.UTF8 I now get 'ó' instead of '?' but it's still not the correct output. –  Dan Vogel Jun 20 '13 at 21:43

Pretty sure its because you are using the wrong encoding, try this:

using (XmlTextWriter writer = new XmlTextWriter(ms, Encoding.Unicode))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for response please see my comment on Jacob's answer. –  Dan Vogel Jun 20 '13 at 21:44
    
You could always use the hex: &#xF3; –  EkoostikMartin Jun 20 '13 at 21:50

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