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Is it possible to create a templated function that checks if a primitive data type can fit a value of potentially different primitive data type? Let's limit the scope to integer types for the moment.

More precisely: Is it possible to create a "one fit all" templated functions yet without getting compiler warnings (boolean expression always true/false, signed/unsigned comparison, unused variable) and without disabling compiler warning checks? The functions should also limit as much as possible checks at runtime (all trivial cases should be excluded at compile time). If possible, I would prefer avoiding using extensions from C++11 and the like (unless a "quick" replacement for "old" C++ exists).

Note: "value" is not known at compile time, only its type.

Example of expected behaviour:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    for (int i = 1; i < argc; i++) {
        const int value = atoi(argv[i]);
        std::cout << value << ": ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<int8_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<int16_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<uint16_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<int32_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<uint32_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<int64_t>(value) << " ";
        std::cout << CanTypeFitValue<uint64_t>(value) << std::endl;
        }

}



./a.out 6 1203032847 2394857 -13423 9324 -192992929

6: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1203032847: 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

2394857: 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

-13423: 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

9324: 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1

-192992929: 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0

Test your code here or here.

Check the assembly generated here.

This question was inspired by this post

share|improve this question
1  
Mandatory viewing. –  Kerrek SB Jun 20 '13 at 21:41
    
What am I going to learn? –  Antonio Jun 20 '13 at 21:51
    
@KerrekSB Does the guy in that video have an account on Stackoverflow? That would be cool. –  0x499602D2 Jun 20 '13 at 22:09
    
@0x499602D2: yes –  Mooing Duck Jun 20 '13 at 23:34

6 Answers 6

Certainly

template <typename T, typename U>
constexpr bool CanTypeFitValue(const U value)
{return ((value>U(0))==(T(value)>T(0))) && U(T(value))==value;}

//      (         part1         ) && (      part2      )

Basically, this has two parts. The first part confirms that if a sign change happens (casting unsigned to signed or vice-versa, that the sign information isn't lost. The second part simply checks if value is cast to a T and back, that it retains it's value, and no bits have been lost.

FYI I'm not certain this is enough to tell if the value is maintained, but can't immediately think of a case with primitives that would fail. Both my answer and Casey's answer should work on user-defined numeric-like types so long as they provide conversion operators both ways between T and U.

Here's proof that it passes the tests you post in the question.

share|improve this answer
    
"value" is not known at compile time. It was visible from the example I gave, now I have underlined it in the question. –  Antonio Jun 21 '13 at 6:40
2  
Antonio, despite the word constexpr, all the solutions I see on this page work just fine with runtime variables too. You might mistunderstand what constexpr does. –  Mooing Duck Jun 21 '13 at 16:54
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using numeric_limits and types defined in stdint.h

More compact that my first solution, same efficiency.

Drawback: one additional header to be included.

#include <limits>
#include <stdint.h>

using std::numeric_limits;

template <typename T, typename U>
    bool CanTypeFitValue(const U value) {
        const intmax_t botT = intmax_t(numeric_limits<T>::min() );
        const intmax_t botU = intmax_t(numeric_limits<U>::min() );
        const uintmax_t topT = uintmax_t(numeric_limits<T>::max() );
        const uintmax_t topU = uintmax_t(numeric_limits<U>::max() );
        return !( (botT > botU && value < static_cast<U> (botT)) || (topT < topU && value > static_cast<U> (topT)) );        
    }

Assembly code generated (you can change T and U types)

Correctness test

Constexpr version from Mooing Duck:

template <typename T, typename U>
constexpr bool CanTypeFitValue(U value) {
  return ( std::numeric_limits<T>::min() <= (intmax_t)std::numeric_limits<U>::min() || 
           value >= static_cast<U>(std::numeric_limits<T>::min())
         ) && (
           std::numeric_limits<T>::max() >= (uintmax_t)std::numeric_limits<U>::max() || 
           value <= static_cast<U>(std::numeric_limits<T>::max())
         );
}
share|improve this answer
    
The assembly is slightly longer if you go from int to short, but... wow. I'm impressed. You do lose constexpr unfortunately, but if it's important, it's easy to add that back. –  Mooing Duck Jun 22 '13 at 19:11
    
@MooingDuck Thanks! :) I cannot see though in which way for the case int->short assembly generated is longer. And, sorry for asking so openly, do you think also the question could get a thump up? –  Antonio Jun 22 '13 at 19:24
    
already gave you +1. Here, I got it constexpr. (By longer I meant that CanTypeFitValue<short>(int); is 3 ops instead of just two) –  Mooing Duck Jun 22 '13 at 19:34
    
@MooingDuck I meant +1 to the question, not the answer. Anyway thanks. How could it be only 2 ops? Thanks for constexpr version! I will edit the answer to include it! –  Antonio Jun 22 '13 at 19:50
1  
we must have had a communication error, I believe your code has the minimm number of ops. Casting from int to unsigned and similar merely changes which instructions are generated by the compiler, casts does not take an op. –  Mooing Duck Jun 22 '13 at 22:44

I've used something similar in the past to determine if T can represent the value u of type U exactly (remove constexpr to make this C++03):

template <typename T, typename U>
constexpr inline bool CanTypeRepresentValue(const U value) {
    return ((value > U()) == (static_cast<T>(value) > T())) &&
           (value == static_cast<U>(static_cast<T>(value)));
}

This should work at least for all arithmetic types, and for user-defined types with appropriate conversions. (test at ideone).

share|improve this answer
    
"value" is not known at compile time. It was visible from the example I gave, now I have underlined it in the question. –  Antonio Jun 21 '13 at 6:41
1  
value doesn't need to be known at compile time - use of constexpr here just makes it possible to compute the result at compile time if it is. –  Casey Jun 21 '13 at 17:24
    
Edited your example into my ideone code, had to use cin instead of argc/argv (If you can pass command line arguments at ideone, I don't know how.) –  Casey Jun 21 '13 at 17:31
    
Let's say both variables are int, the compiler will understand at compile time that the expression is binded to be true? –  Antonio Jun 22 '13 at 8:29
2  
@Antonio Sure. But don't take my word for it, see for yourself at gcc.godbolt.org. –  Casey Jun 22 '13 at 12:24

Using the features of C++11 (yes, I know you didn't ask for that, but it's fun anyway) and use of templates, this is what I came up with:

http://ideone.com/lBxnAW (updated version: now also accepts unsigned to signed, short and beautiful)

This basically uses std::enable_if extensively with type_traits std::is_unsigned and std::is_integral. Best to read from bottom up (as the decision tree builds up from there).

Obviously this is nearly all done compile time, so assembly should be fairly small.

This solution can handle integral and floating point target types as well as integral and floating point original types.

If the check isn't trivial (i.e. bounds of data type have to be checked), the actual_type value n is casted to typename std::common_type<target, actual_type>::type statically.

Every decision is_integral and is_unsigned and is_same is done at compile time, so no overhead from this at runtime. The check boils down to some lower_bound(target) <= value and / or value <= upper_bound(target) after the types are casted to a common type (to avoid warnings and prevent overflows).

#include <cmath> // necessary to check for floats too
#include <cstdint> // for testing only
#include <iomanip> // for testing only
#include <iostream> // for testing only
#include <limits> // necessary to check ranges
#include <type_traits> // necessary to check type properties (very efficient, compile time!)

// the upper bound must always be checked
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
bool test_upper_bound(const actual_type n)
{
   typedef typename std::common_type<target_type, actual_type>::type common_type;
   const auto c_n = static_cast<common_type>(n);
   const auto t_max = static_cast<common_type>(std::numeric_limits<target_type>::max());
   return ( c_n <= t_max );
}

// the lower bound is only needed to be checked explicitely in non-trivial cases, see the next to functions
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<!(std::is_unsigned<target_type>::value), bool>::type
test_lower_bound(const actual_type n)
{
   typedef typename std::common_type<target_type, actual_type>::type common_type;
   const auto c_n = static_cast<common_type>(n);
   const auto t_min = static_cast<common_type>(std::numeric_limits<target_type>::lowest());
   return ( c_n >= t_min );
}

// for unsigned target types, the sign of n musn't be negative
// but that's not an issue with unsigned actual_type
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<target_type>::value &&
                        std::is_unsigned<target_type>::value &&
                        std::is_integral<actual_type>::value &&
                        std::is_unsigned<actual_type>::value, bool>::type
test_lower_bound(const actual_type)
{
   return true;
}

// for unsigned target types, the sign of n musn't be negative
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<target_type>::value &&
                        std::is_unsigned<target_type>::value &&
                        (!std::is_integral<actual_type>::value ||
                         !std::is_unsigned<actual_type>::value), bool>::type
test_lower_bound(const actual_type n)
{
   return ( n >= 0 );
}

// value may be integral if the target type is non-integral
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_integral<target_type>::value, bool>::type
test_integrality(const actual_type)
{
   return true;
}

// value must be integral if the target type is integral
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_integral<target_type>::value, bool>::type
test_integrality(const actual_type n)
{
   return ( (std::abs(n - std::floor(n)) < 1e-8) || (std::abs(n - std::ceil(n)) < 1e-8) );
}

// perform check only if non-trivial
template <typename target_type, typename actual_type>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_same<target_type, actual_type>::value, bool>::type
CanTypeFitValue(const actual_type n)
{
   return test_upper_bound<target_type>(n) &&
          test_lower_bound<target_type>(n) &&
          test_integrality<target_type>(n);
}


// trivial case: actual_type == target_type
template <typename actual_type>
bool CanTypeFitValue(const actual_type)
{
   return true;
}

int main()
{
   int ns[] = {6, 1203032847, 2394857, -13423, 9324, -192992929};
   for ( const auto n : ns )
   {
      std::cout << std::setw(10) << n << "\t";
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int8_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int16_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint16_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int32_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint32_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int64_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint64_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<float>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<double>(n);
      std::cout << "\n";
   }
   std::cout << "\n";
   unsigned long long uss[] = {6, 1201146189143ull, 2397, 23};
   for ( const auto n : uss )
   {
      std::cout << std::setw(10) << n << "\t";
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int8_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int16_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint16_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int32_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint32_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int64_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint64_t>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<float>(n);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<double>(n);
      std::cout << "\n";
   }
   std::cout << "\n";
   float fs[] = {0.0, 0.5, -0.5, 1.0, -1.0, 1e10, -1e10};
   for ( const auto f : fs )
   {
      std::cout << std::setw(10) << f << "\t";
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int8_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int16_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint16_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int32_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint32_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<int64_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<uint64_t>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<float>(f);
      std::cout << " " << CanTypeFitValue<double>(f);
      std::cout << "\n";
   }
}

This (new) version quickly decides (at compile time!) if checks are needed (concerning upper bound, lower bound and integrality) and uses the correct version (to avoid warnings about stupid >= 0 comparisons with unsigned types) (also at compile time). E.g. the integrality does not need to be checked if the target is float, the lower bound does not need to be checked if both types are unsigned etc.

The most obvious optimization (having equal types), is done with std::is_same.

This approach can also be extended to used-defined types with specialized templates. Checks such as std::is_integral will be negative on those types.

You can check that the assembler output is fairly small (except for the obvious case of floats) here or by invoking g++ with -S.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting! So can you tell something more about the scope of your function? I mean, it solves the problem for integers and on top of that... –  Antonio Jun 27 '13 at 11:47
    
@Antonio can you please clarify your comment? Or was it about "this solves the problem for floats as well"? –  stefan Jun 27 '13 at 12:07
    
Yeah, if it is just that, please put it in a short summary –  Antonio Jun 27 '13 at 12:10
    
@Antonio I thought that's what I did. Did you check the updated answer yet? –  stefan Jun 27 '13 at 12:11
    
No I hadn't :) Ok, thanks for the update!, will read thoroughly within the end of the week... –  Antonio Jun 27 '13 at 12:16

I propose a solution using numeric_limits

#include <limits>
using std::numeric_limits;

template <typename T, typename U>
    bool CanTypeFitValue(const U value) {
        if (numeric_limits<T>::is_signed == numeric_limits<U>::is_signed) {
            if (numeric_limits<T>::digits >= numeric_limits<U>::digits)
                return true;
            else
                return (static_cast<U>(numeric_limits<T>::min() ) <= value && static_cast<U>(numeric_limits<T>::max() ) >= value);
        }
        else {
            if (numeric_limits<T>::is_signed) {
                if (numeric_limits<T>::digits > numeric_limits<U>::digits) //Not >= in this case!
                    return true;
                else
                    return (static_cast<U>(numeric_limits<T>::max() ) >= value);
            }
            else ///U is signed, T is not
                if (value < static_cast<U> (0) )
                    return false;
                else
                    if (numeric_limits<T>::digits >= numeric_limits<U>::digits)
                        return true;
                    else
                        return (static_cast<U>(numeric_limits<T>::max() ) >= value);
        }
    }

Tested here (Sorry for using atoi :) ).

share|improve this answer
    
That seems a wee bit over complicated –  Mooing Duck Jun 21 '13 at 16:59
    
Your code says I can cast 0.5 to an int safely –  Mooing Duck Jun 21 '13 at 17:06
1  
@MooingDuck Antonio's did say "Let's limit the scope to integer types for the moment." in the OP. –  Casey Jun 21 '13 at 17:34
    
oh, so it does. I misremembered that as limiting to primitives. –  Mooing Duck Jun 21 '13 at 18:53
    
@MooingDuck Yeah, it's very complicated, but testing it here, it produces the smallest assembly code... I wonder if there is any way to obtain a methods that combines efficiency and conciseness... –  Antonio Jun 22 '13 at 13:34

The most explicit way is probably to use SFINAE and a function for each type. Something like this:

#include <limits>


template <typename T>
bool CanTypeFitValue(int) {
    return false;
}

template <typename T>
bool CanSignedNumericTypeFitValue(int value) {
    return (value >= std::numeric_limits<T>::min() && 
            value <= std::numeric_limits<T>::max());
}

template <typename T>
bool CanUnsignedNumericTypeFitValue(int value) {
    return (value >= 0 && 
            static_cast<unsigned>(value) <= std::numeric_limits<T>::max());
}

template <> bool CanTypeFitValue<int8_t>(int value) { 
    return CanSignedNumericTypeFitValue<int8_t>(value); 
}
template <> bool CanTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(int value) {
    return CanUnsignedNumericTypeFitValue<uint8_t>(value); 
}
// .....
//template <> bool CanTypeFitValue<SomeUserClass * > { 
//    return impl_details(value);
//};

It's also commonly used in STL/Boost etc.

The main idea is the function can be defined along with user defined type.

share|improve this answer
    
I suggest you read more carefully the question, and you try to compile your code with the links given. This will give warnings of comparing signed against unsigned when T is of unsigned type. It will probably not work because of this, especially for numbers close to the limit, like an unsigned int 4,000,000,000. Finally, it's not clear to me why you reduced the template parameters, forcing you to implement the function for any kind of input type for value. And you forgot to specify value as name of the input variable in the function. –  Antonio Jun 24 '13 at 21:25
    
Yes you're right, this function will fail on input value close to the limits. I wrote this only to show the idea. –  user2517908 Jun 24 '13 at 21:46
    
Sorry for posting untested code. I modified it. –  user2517908 Jun 24 '13 at 22:05
    
You have only followed up part of my comments. I also suggest that you test your code here, leaving more or less unmodified the main function. You can then share your code, with the share button. –  Antonio Jun 24 '13 at 22:12

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