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So I should preface this by saying I've actually solved this, but the syntax is horrible so I want to see if theres a Perl-ish way of doing it which is nicer.

I have two arrays of length n (@genes and @names). I want to combine them into a single 2D array of paired values.

My approach right now is;

$Num = Number of elements in each array

my @genes = ();
foreach my $i ( 0 .. $num-1 ) {
    foreach my $j ( 0 .. 1 ) {
    if ($j == 0){ push @{ $genes[$i] }, $names[$i];}
    if ($j == 1){ push @{ $genes[$i] }, $lengths[$i];}
    }
}

But this requires an explicit line for each additional column (right now I have two - names and length). Also it's hideous. Code only a mother could love.

Any thoughts. Note that

@genes = (\@lengths, \@names);

Does not achieve what I want.

share|improve this question
    
You did mean to say that you have two arrays @names and @length that you want to combine into a 2D-array @genes, I take it? –  TLP Jun 21 '13 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can at least do this:

foreach my $i ( 0 .. $num-1 ) {
    push @genes, [$names[$i], $lengths[$i]];
}

If you don't care about the input arrays, you can consume them:

push @genes, [shift @names, shift @lengths] while @names;

There are also some modules you can use for iterating over multiple lists. For example, using List::MoreUtils::each_array:

use List::MoreUtils qw( each_array );
my $it = each_array( @names, @lengths );
while (my ($n, $l) = $it->()) {
    push @genes, [$n, $l];
}

Further, with List::MoreUtils::pairwise:

use List::MoreUtils qw( pairwise );
@genes = pairwise{ [our $a, our $b] } @names, @lengths;

Suggested by ysth, with Algorithm::Loops::MapCarE:

use Algorithm::Loops 'MapCarE';
@genes = MapCarE { \@_ } \( @names, @lengths );
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome - that first syntax is clearly a much cleaner implementation (and in hind-site not in anyway Perl specific) –  Alex Jun 20 '13 at 23:59

You could write

my @genes = map [ $names[$_], $lengths[$_] ], 0 .. $#names;
share|improve this answer

Incidentally, your original code can be cleaned up just by removing some unnecessary logic:

foreach my $i ( 0 .. $num-1 ) {
    foreach my $j ( 0 .. 1 ) {
        if ($j == 0){ push @{ $genes[$i] }, $names[$i];}
        if ($j == 1){ push @{ $genes[$i] }, $lengths[$i];}
    }
}

You're looping over 0 and 1, then testing if you're on 0 or 1, then performing one action or the other? Just perform the two actions each time:

foreach my $i ( 0 .. $num-1 ) {
  push @{$genes[$i]}, $names[$i];
  push @{$genes[$i]}, $lengths[$i]
}

Possibly you started out wanting to loop over the indexes, then thought you couldn't do this since the internal arrays didn't exist yet, and fell back to this push construction. But, er, the arrays don't exist until you push onto them here, either. Looping over the indexes was fine:

my @helper = (\@names, \@lengths);
foreach my $i ( 0 .. $#names ) {
    foreach my $j ( 0 .. 1 ) {
        $genes[$i][$j] = $helper[$j][$i];
    }
}
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