Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So I'm a bit curious about why this doesn't work.

How come code like:

for a in range(10) and b in range(10):
  print a + b

generates an error that says 'b is not defined'?

Also, code like:

for a,b in range(10):
  print a + b

generates an error: 'int objects are not iterable'.

Why? I haven't established their value beforehand, so how would Python know they are int objects? Also, I know you could use a while loop instead, but is there any way to carry out the sort of operation I'm doing using a for-loop alone?

share|improve this question
    
What do you expect a and b to be? –  dawg Jun 21 '13 at 0:14
    
Your attempt is parsed as for a in (range(10) and (b in range(10)). b must be defined in order to evaluate the second part of the and expression. (The first part, range(10), will always be true since it is a non-empty list in Python 2 and a range object in Python 3.) –  chepner Jun 21 '13 at 3:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
for a,b in zip(range(10),range(10)):
    print a + b

should work great... assuming I understood your question properly if not then

for a in range(10):
    for b in range(10):
        print a+b

or even [a+b for a in range(10) for b in range(10)]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I was looking for something like the latter piece of code; provides me a great sequence of numbers I'm trying to use to answer a Project Euler problem. –  Liongold Jun 21 '13 at 0:23

Other answers explained the right way to do it, but nobody explained what was wrong with what you did yet.

for a in range(10) and b in range(10):
  print a + b

That's a cute idea of some intuitive syntax, but Python doesn't know that one. The precedence of what you programmed actually works out like this:

for a in ((range(10)) and (b in range(10))):

Python thinks you're trying to make a complex expression to generate a single iterable to iterate over. The first error occurs when it tries to evaluate b to build the value. If b was defined, then b in range(10) would result in True or False. The result of anding it with range(10) will also be a boolean. Then you'd hit another error trying to iterate over a boolean.

for a,b in range(10):
  print a + b

This kind of syntax works, if the enumeration on the right contains elements that are 2-tuples. The first step in this for loop is the equivalent of trying a,b = 0. It tries to "unpack" the right hand side by iterating over it. But you can't iterate over a single integer. a and b are not defined yet, but the first element of range(10) is. That's the integer you can't iterate over.

share|improve this answer

You can only iterate over a single iterable at a time in a for loop, the code in your question as it is, is invalid. I believe this is what you intended - iterating over the two ranges simultaneously:

for a, b in zip(range(10), range(10)):
    print a + b

The zip function creates a single iterable of 2-element tuples, taking one element from each range, and then we can unpack each element from the tuple into separate variables.

EDIT:

If you were trying to nest one loop inside the other, the standard way to do it would be this:

for a in range(10):
    for b in range(10):
        print a + b

But we can achieve the same effect by using itertools.product, which looks closer to what you had in mind in the first place:

import itertools as it
for a, b in it.product(range(10), range(10)):
    print a + b
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. What I was actually trying to do was addressed by Joran Beasley, but I didn't know about the zip function. Thanks! –  Liongold Jun 21 '13 at 0:21
    
@Liongold oh, I see :) anyway, see my edited answer, you'll find a nice alternative at the end –  Óscar López Jun 21 '13 at 0:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.