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I have a python code that broadcasts a message, and receives the broadcasted message using UDP (SOCK_DGRAM). The python source code is in this post: http://stackoverflow.com/a/17055865/260127

I need to translate this python code into C++/C. I googled to manually translate the functions one by one to get this code.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <sys/types.h> 

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <thread>

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>

using namespace std;
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/13898207/recvfrom-bad-address-sendto-address-family-not-supported-by-protocol
// http://linux.die.net/man/3/setsockopt

void pinger(string msg)
{
    cout << "pinger spawned: " << msg;

    int bytes_sent;
    char data_sent[256] = "This is a test";
    struct sockaddr_in to;
    int addrlen;
    int s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);

    memset(&to, 0, sizeof(to));
    to.sin_family = AF_INET;
    to.sin_addr.s_addr   = inet_addr("192.168.65.255");
    to.sin_port   = htons(4499);

    int optval = 1;
    socklen_t optlen;
    getsockopt(s, SOL_SOCKET, SO_BROADCAST, &optval, &optlen);
    getsockopt(s, SOL_SOCKET, SO_REUSEADDR, &optval, &optlen);
    if (optval != 0) {
        cout << "SO_BROADCAST enabled on s!\n";
    }

    sleep(0.1);

    bytes_sent = sendto(s, data_sent, sizeof(data_sent), 0,
           (struct sockaddr*)&to, sizeof(to));
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{

    thread pingerThread(pinger, "Message");
    pingerThread.join(); 

    // get the message

    int bytes_received;
    char data_received[256];

    struct sockaddr_in from; 

    memset(&from, 0, sizeof(from));
    from.sin_family = AF_INET;
    from.sin_addr.s_addr   = inet_addr("192.168.65.255");
    from.sin_port   = htons(4499); 

    int s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0);

    if(s == -1)
        perror("socket");

    if (bind(s, (struct sockaddr*)&from, sizeof(from)) == -1)
    {
        perror("Bind error");
    } 

    socklen_t len = sizeof from;
    if(recvfrom(s, data_received, 256, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&from, &len)==-1)
        perror("recvfrom");

    if(close(s) == -1)
        perror("close");

}   

There is no error in compilation, but when I execute the code, it seems to wait forever. I can't get the pinger's cout message.

What is wrong with this code?

share|improve this question
    
"Nothing happens" is a pretty generic. Why don't you put a couple of prints just to isolate the problem? Perhaps one after the join(), one before the recvfrom and one after. Your code seems to be correct so if it waits forever probably it's the recvfrom which doesn't receive any data. –  Rob013 Jun 21 '13 at 0:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looking at the Python code to figure out what you're trying to do, here's your mistake:

thread pingerThread(pinger, "Message");
pingerThread.join(); 

The difference is pretty obvious: the Python code does not call a.join() anywhere (which means the thread is implicitly joined at the end of the main script), but in the C++ port, you've inserted an immediate pingerThread.join() for some reason.

So, why does that make a difference? Because it guarantees a deadlock. The pinger thread can't finish until it's received a message. It's expecting to receive that message from the main thread. But the main thread is stuck in that join call, waiting for the pinger thread to finish.

You can't solve this by just removing the join, because in C++ you are required to join every std::thread before it goes out of scope. (It's a very good idea to make your joins explicit in Python, but in C++, it's not just a good idea, it's the law, and your program will be terminated if you break it.) So, just move it to the end of the main function.


There's are some other serious problem in your code.


Python time.sleep takes a floating-point number with fractional seconds; the POSIX sleep you're calling from C++ takes an unsigned int, and cannot be used to sleep for fractional seconds. This means your sleep(0.1) implicitly casts the 0.1 to 0.

Your compiler should warn you about this, something like this:

pinger.cpp:40:11: warning: implicit conversion from 'double' to 'unsigned int'
      changes value from 0.1 to 0 [-Wliteral-conversion]
    sleep(0.1);
    ~~~~~ ^~~

If your platform has POSIX sleep, it probably also has POSIX nanosleep (unless it's very old, in which case it probably at least has BSD usleep), so use that instead.

However, despite what the author of that Python code said, the sleep(0.1) doesn't really solve issue #3 ("Sometimes, the thread spawns so quickly that the listener just misses the broadcast data") in the first place.

The first rule of threading is that you cannot solve race conditions with sleep calls. All you can do is tune the reproducibility of your bugs to the point where they happen just often enough to make your program unusable in practice but not often enough to debug why it's unusable.

There is nothing magic about waiting for 100ms that guarantees that the main thread will have reached its recvfrom. Threads get descheduled for 100ms all the time, especially on busy systems.

The only solution is to sequence things properly. Whether this means changing the order of operations, using synchronization primitives, using the sockets themselves for sequencing, changing your logic (e.g., the accepted answer to that question solves the problem by sending the data repeatedly).


The Python code calls setsockopt, to allow the program to reuse the address, and to turn on broadcast mode. But your C++ port calls getsockopt, which just reads the values of the two options, not changing anything. So if, e.g., you run the same program twice in a row, the second time it will likely fail to bind the address.

Also, you're not initializing the value of optlen to anything. You must set it to sizeof(optval) or you can end up stomping all over the stack—or just reading only the first 0 bytes of the optional value instead of all 4 bytes, meaning you're not checking anything at all.

Also, you have to check the return value from getsockopt before using the value returned. And there's no good reason to call getsockopt twice in a row and overwrite the first optval without ever checking it.

Meanwhile, the Python code was already doing it wrong: You need to set SO_REUSEADDR on the side that calls bind, not the side that sends to it.


Also, while Python's socket.sendto takes a string and sends as many bytes as are in the string, C's sendto takes a string and a length, and sends length bytes, even if the string terminates before that.

So, you're sending 256 bytes instead of 14.


Also, you're never closing the sending socket, only the listening socket.

That was already a problem in your Python code, but it's a much worse problem in C++ code. In Python, if you forget to close something, it will eventually get garbage collected, and sometimes that's good enough. In C++, except for classes designed to be self-managing (which includes most C++ classes in the standard library, but not C-level things like file handles), you have to explicitly clean up after yourself.

For a toy program that's just going to exit immediately, it probably doesn't matter. But in real-life code, it does.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It was a great help. –  prosseek Jun 21 '13 at 2:07
1  
also note that sleep is not the same as "yield", many older and some extant implementations of sleep actually cause the kernel to yield the entire process. –  kfsone Jun 21 '13 at 2:30
    
@kfsone: Good point. POSIX specifies that it "shall cause the calling thread to be suspended from execution", but older *nix platforms (like Solaris, if you're using 2-level threading), and non-*nix platforms that provide some POSIX-like functionality in their libc (notably Windows) may not be bound by that. Plus, in Python, on some platforms, it's common for the GIL-holding thread to go to sleep without releasing the GIL, which has the same basic effect. –  abarnert Jun 21 '13 at 18:38

Based on the answers, I modified the code to make it work.

  1. I don't use the thread to broadcast the message, I just called the function.
  2. I made the code to send message after binding.

This is the modified code:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <sys/types.h> 
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <thread>

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>

#include <cassert>

using namespace std;
// http://stackoverflow.com/questions/13898207/recvfrom-bad-address-sendto-address-family-not-supported-by-protocol
// http://linux.die.net/man/3/setsockopt

void pinger(string msg)
{
    sockaddr_in si_me, si_other;
    int s;

    assert((s=socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP))!=-1);

    int port=4499;

    int broadcast=1;
    setsockopt(s, SOL_SOCKET, SO_BROADCAST,
                &broadcast, sizeof broadcast);

    memset(&si_me, 0, sizeof(si_me));
    si_me.sin_family = AF_INET;
    si_me.sin_port = htons(port);
    si_me.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("192.168.65.255");

    unsigned char buffer[10] = "hello";
    int bytes_sent = sendto(s, buffer, sizeof(buffer), 0,
               (struct sockaddr*)&si_me, sizeof(si_me));
    cout << bytes_sent; 
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) 
{

        sockaddr_in si_me;
        unsigned char buffer[20];
        int s;

        assert((s=socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, IPPROTO_UDP))!=-1);

        int port=4499;
        memset(&si_me, 0, sizeof(si_me));
        si_me.sin_family = AF_INET;
        si_me.sin_port = htons(port);
        si_me.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("192.168.65.255");


        if (bind(s, (struct sockaddr*)&si_me, sizeof(si_me)) == -1)
        {
            perror("Bind error");
        } 

        // Send the message after the bind     
        pinger("hello");

        socklen_t len = sizeof si_me;
        if(recvfrom(s, buffer, 20, 0, (struct sockaddr*)&si_me, &len)==-1)
            perror("recvfrom");

        cout << "\nRECEIVE" << buffer; 

        if(close(s) == -1)
            perror("close");

}    
share|improve this answer
    
This is definitely a lot simpler. Of course it's not all that useful, but for a toy example used for teaching yourself, that doesn't matter. But it's not equivalent to the Python code you were trying to port, because it's completely synchronous, so it's not an example of most of the actual interesting parts. –  abarnert Jun 21 '13 at 18:44
    
@abarnert: Thanks for the comment, I did want to implement it with thread, but I couldn't make it work. –  prosseek Jun 21 '13 at 19:52
    
Well, I suppose it's worth doing this first, and then do the threading next, so you can make sure you understand sockets in C++ and get that out of the way, before making sure you understand threads in C++. Anyway, my answer should show the hard part of doing it with threads; if you get that basically working, but have problems with the sequencing (e.g., sometimes you receive before there's anything sent), you can always post a new question. –  abarnert Jun 21 '13 at 23:43

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