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I'm using jquery to make a ajax request to determine if it should open a div when a specific radio button is clicked. I want the div that opens to appear directly under the radio button that is selected. I have the following that seems to work great:

<script language="javascript">
$(document).ready(function(){
    $(".option_select").click(function() {
        $(this).next().after($('#show_pop'));
        $.ajax({
          dataType: 'jsonp',
          url: "/jrequest",
          data: {
            Action: "Do", 
            Option: po,               
          },              
          success: function (response) {                    
            if (response['SomeResponse']) {
                $('#show_pop').slideDown("slow");
            } else {
                $('#show_pop').hide();
            }                       
          },    
          error: function (xmlhttp) {
                console.log(xmlhttp);                   
          }
        });                     
    } 
    }); 
});
</script>

<input type="radio" name="Option1" class="option_select" value="Option1" /> Option 1
<input type="radio" name="Option2" class="option_select" value="Option2" /> Option 2
<input type="radio" name="Option3" class="option_select" value="Option3" /> Option 3

What I don't understand is why I can't do the "after" as part of the "success" of the ajax? For example, if I move the line

$(this).next().after($('#show_pop'));

To here:

....
  success: function (response) {                    
    if (response['SomeResponse']) {
        $(this).next().after($('#show_pop')); // This line does not seem to work here
        $('#show_pop').slideDown("slow");
    } else {
        $('#show_pop').hide();
    }                       
 },
....     

Then my div simply opens above my form, not below each option. Can someone explain why?

TIA!

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Benjamin Gruenbaum, Sushanth --, Omar, Rushi, jcwenger Jun 21 '13 at 13:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Thanks, I'm still trying to learn jquery but now I understand how these 2 posts relate –  Analog Jun 21 '13 at 0:48

1 Answer 1

this in the success callback is not the jQuery object but the ajax settings used in the call ($.ajaxSettings merged with this call to $.ajax).

There are a variety of solutions:

Reassign this

As with other languages, JS allows you to reassign the this variable, which has a special meaning on its own depending on the scope. Other variable names may not have such a restriction and can be used in lower scopes freely.

$(".option_select").click(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    /* snip */
        success: function () {
            $this.next();
        }

Use Function.bind or $.proxy

Function.bind allows you to set the context of a function to be called later. This is similar to .call and .apply, but it does not immediately call the function. The context set by .bind takes precedence over one set by .call/.apply, so this can be used with ajax callbacks (which I assume use .call later, but I haven't verified this).

jQuery has a method $.proxy that does the same thing but is compatible with browsers where Function.bind is not available. It works a bit differently and is a jQuery method rather than a Function method, but it doesn't matter much in this case.

success: function () { /* your code */ }.bind(this)
success: $.proxy(function () { /* your code */ }, this)

Both methods return a function.

Personally I find this to be the most correct solution although they will all work essentially the same.

Use $.ajax context

You can set this with $.ajaxSettings in general, but that probably wouldn't make sense in this case. This setting sets the context for all callbacks for $.ajax.

$.ajax({
    context: this,

Use of this in the examples above.

Note that the $.ajax({ declaration does not create its own scope. Thus it is safe to do:

$(".option_select").on("click", function () {
    $.ajax({success: function () {}.bind(this)});
});

Above, this is still the DOM element jQuery sets as the context of the .click callback. The only other scope created is by function () {}, but you use this outside of that.

More information is available on the $.ajax documentation

share|improve this answer
    
While this is a duplicate, I think your solution here is better than the one suggested over there since your provide alternatives. Would you mind expanding on them a bit? –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Jun 21 '13 at 0:31
1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum done –  Explosion Pills Jun 21 '13 at 0:45
    
Awesome! Thank you, I understand now! –  Analog Jun 21 '13 at 0:48

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