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What is the difference between #include and #import in C++?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

#import is a Microsoft-specific thing, apparently for COM or .NET stuff only.

#include is a standard C/C++ preprocessor statement, used for including header (or occasionally other source code) files in your source code file.

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This is not true. The #import directive was officially undeprecated by the gcc team in version 3.4 and works fine 99% of the time in all previous versions of gcc which support –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 5 '08 at 17:04
1  
... which support #import –  Brian R. Bondy Oct 5 '08 at 17:05
    
Curious, I wasn't aware of that. Perhaps I should have said it's a COM- and .NET-specific thing instead. –  Head Geek Oct 5 '08 at 17:08
15  
The #import supported by gcc is a nonportable way to include a header once only: <a href="gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.3.2/cpp/…;. It is completely unrelated to the Microsoft COM #import. –  fizzer Oct 5 '08 at 18:04
    
The GCC #import is actually an Objective-C preprocessor command that happens to work with .c files in gcc and clang(except in pedantic mode). –  Michael Morris Mar 29 at 3:50

Import in VC++: #import is for type libraries or .tlbs (COM stuff).

The content of the type library is converted into C++ classes, mostly describing the COM interfaces for you automatically, and then it is included into your file.

The #import directive was introduced by Microsoft as an extension to the C++ language. You can read about it at this MSDN article.

The #import directive is also used with .NET / CLI stuff.

Import in gcc: The import in gcc is different from the import in VC++. It is a simple way to include a header at most once only. (In VC++ and GCC you can do this via #pragma once as well)

The #import directive was officially undeprecated by the gcc team in version 3.4 and works fine 99% of the time in all previous versions of gcc which support

Include: #include is for mostly header files, but to prepend the content to your current file. #include is part of the C++ standard. You can read about it at this MSDN article.

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#import is overall a solution to the usual

#ifndef ...
#define ...
#include ...
#endif

work-around. #import includes a file only if it hasn't been included before.

It might be worth noting that Apple's Objective-C also uses #import statements.

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import was also one of the keywords associated with n2073, Modules in C++, proposed to the language committee by Daveed Vandevoorde in September 2006. I'm not enough of a language geek to know if that proposal was definitively shelved or if it's awaiting an implementation (proof of concept) from the author or someone else...

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Daveed was an EDG employee at the time, so I'd expect them to have so working code. –  MSalters Oct 6 '08 at 14:37
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I sure hope they've done the requisite legwork, because it would be very nice to move from '#include' to an import mechanism. But I've heard nary a peep on this feature, and I'm pretty sure it's not in C++0X. Maybe sometime before I retire ;^)~ –  Don Wakefield Oct 7 '08 at 22:54
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As I feared, it's a few years out: Modules in C++09? –  Don Wakefield Oct 27 '08 at 22:45

Please note that in gcc 4.1, #import is deprecated. If you use it, you will get warning:

#import is a deprecated GCC extension

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