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I’m creating Android apps and need to save date/time of the creation record. What is the best way to do that? I will need to compare it later. For instance, in my apps I will show all record are created between date A until date B.

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closed as not a real question by tkanzakic, Kristoffer Sall-Storgaard, Achrome, Pete, JMK Jun 21 '13 at 8:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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sqlite.org/datatype3.html –  LuckyMe Jun 21 '13 at 3:13
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It is very clear what is being asked. –  cja Feb 13 '14 at 14:32
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Perfectly good question. What is wrong with moderators? –  Anderson Mar 21 '14 at 6:46
    
To those who approved the edited question: I have no idea why. The added content was asking for advantages of various techniques, which would turn this into an opinion-seeking question. –  David Makogon Nov 17 '14 at 4:08

4 Answers 4

SQlite does not have a specific datetime type. You can use TEXT, REAL or INTEGER types, whichever suits your needs.

Straight from the DOCS

SQLite does not have a storage class set aside for storing dates and/or times. Instead, the built-in Date And Time Functions of SQLite are capable of storing dates and times as TEXT, REAL, or INTEGER values:

  • TEXT as ISO8601 strings ("YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.SSS").
  • REAL as Julian day numbers, the number of days since noon in Greenwich on November 24, 4714 B.C. according to the proleptic Gregorian calendar.
  • INTEGER as Unix Time, the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC.

Applications can chose to store dates and times in any of these formats and freely convert between formats using the built-in date and time functions.

SQLite built-in Date and Time functions can be found here.

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SQLite does not have a storage class set aside for storing dates and/or times. Instead, the built-in Date And Time Functions of SQLite are capable of storing dates and times as TEXT, REAL, or INTEGER values:

TEXT as ISO8601 strings ("YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.SSS"). REAL as Julian day numbers, the number of days since noon in Greenwich on November 24, 4714 B.C. according to the proleptic Gregorian calendar. INTEGER as Unix Time, the number of seconds since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC. Applications can chose to store dates and times in any of these formats and freely convert between formats using the built-in date and time functions.

Having said that, I would use INTEGER and store seconds since Unix epoch (1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC).

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I prefer this as well. The standard date/time related classes are backed internally by longs anyway, and it's pretty easy to compare longs. –  Karakuri Jun 21 '13 at 4:29
    
@dtmilano Why do you prefer INTEGER here instead of a String? –  Igor Ganapolsky Jun 9 '14 at 21:39

Store it in a field of type long. See Date.getTime() and new Date(long)

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how can i compare it ?? can u give me sample of query .. :D –  RR12 Jun 21 '13 at 3:20
    
Look at Joda Time for comparisons in code (joda-time.sourceforge.net) and use simple long comparison in SQL (e.g. numerical comparison). –  Syntax Jun 21 '13 at 4:06
    
select * from table where creation between a and b; –  koem Jun 21 '13 at 4:07

For practically all date and time matters I prefer to simplify things, very, very simple... Down to seconds stored in integers.

Integers will always be supported as integers in databases, flat files, etc. You do a little math and cast it into another type and you can format the date anyway you want.

Doing it this way, you don't have to worry when [insert current favorite database here] is replaced with [future favorite database] which coincidentally didn't use the date format you chose today.

It's just a little math overhead (eg. methods--takes two seconds, I'll post a gist if necessary) and simplifies things for a lot of operations regarding date/time later.

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