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I want to put all my link tags in <head>.

However, I don't know how to render all the link tags in the head of my DOM when I include shared templates via the built in include tag. So my link tags are rendered wherever I happen to include my shared templates. I've added code below to better illustrate my problem.

Layout:

<html>
<head>
    {% block references %}{% endblock %}
</head>
<body>
    {% block content %}{% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

Extending the layout with a template:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endblock %}
...
{% include "mySharedTemplate.html" %}
...

Shared template. Note, this template is shared among a few but not all of my templates:

{% load staticfiles %}
<link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
...

Is there a way to put all my link tags in the head of my DOM while using shared templates? Is there a completely different or better way to do this? I'm a week into my first django project, so even suggestions of basic features may help me!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found a hacky way to do this. I'm not super pleased with it. I found that I can use simple if blocks to toggle which sections of my template I want to render with the include tag. This allows me to include my references and content separately. (Note, I could solve this problem by separating my references and content into separate files. But that seems more tedious than this solution.)

I like this solution better than the current answers because it allows my shared template to be isolated from other templates. Keeping this modular design is important when working with functionality that you can mix and match (which is what I'd like to do with my shared templates).

Template:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
    {% include "mySharedTemplate.html" with references="True" %}
{% endblock %}
...
{% include "mySharedTemplate.html" with content="True" %}
...

Shared Template:

{% if references %}
    {% load staticfiles %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endif %}
{% if content %}
    ...
{% endif %}

To illustrate why I think my modular design is important:

Imagine I have a many shared templates and many regular templates that each use the shared templates in different ways. My modular method makes it easy for regular templates to work with shared templates in flexible ways that best suit them.

Template 2:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
    {% include "mySharedTemplate.html" with references="True" %}
    {% include "mySharedTemplate2.html" with references="True" %}
{% endblock %}
...
{% include "mySharedTemplate.html" with content="True" %}
{% include "mySharedTemplate2.html" with content="True" %}
...

Template 3:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
    {% include "mySharedTemplate2.html" with references="True" %}
    {% include "mySharedTemplate3.html" with references="True" %}
    {% include "mySharedTemplate4.html" with references="True" %}
{% endblock %}
...
{% include "mySharedTemplate4.html" with content="True" %}
{% include "mySharedTemplate3.html" with content="True" %}
{% include "mySharedTemplate2.html" with content="True" %}
...

Notice that Template 2 and Template 3 can use the the shared templates in ways that suit them without much boiler plate code.

share|improve this answer
    
How about shared template into two parts: one for reference, the other for cotnent. – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 4:52
    
@falsetru I think I tried to do that by putting them in separate if blocks. Is there a better way I can do this? Can I include specific blocks with the include tag? – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 4:54
    
Sorry, I was not clear. I mean two template files. – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 4:57
    
I explain why I didn't do that in my answer. Note, I could solve this problem by separating my references and content into separate files. But that seems more tedious than this solution. – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 4:58
    
I don't know way to include specific blocks except your method. – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 4:58

I think you are lookig for {{block.super}}

for example Layout.html:

<html>
<head>
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
   <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">

{% endblock %}
</head>
<body>
    {% block content %}{% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

and in Template.html:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    {{block.super}}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endblock %}

if you do not want to use the mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css for all your pages you only do not use {{block.super}} like Template2.html:

 {% extends "layout.html" %}
    {% load staticfiles %}
    {% block references %}
        <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
    {% endblock %}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather not put mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css in my layout because not all templates use the shared template markup. – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 3:43
    
I updated my answer – Victor Castillo Torres Jun 21 '13 at 3:44
    
I'd rather just include mySharedTemplateStylesheet.css in template.html rather than use block.super. They both basically do the same thing. block.super just obfuscates the code and makes the references block in layout.html include code that it doesn't need to. – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 3:55
    
I've added an answer myself. Please explain why you think your solution or another solution is better if you think this to be the case. I'd be happy to engage! I hate providing my own answers :). – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 5:20

layout.html:

<html>
<head>
    {% block references %}{% endblock %}
</head>
<body>
    {% block content %}{% endblock %}
</body>
</html>

layout-with-shared-css.html:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endblock %}

template without shared template:

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endblock %}

template with shared template:

{% extends "layout-shared-css.html" %}
{% load staticfiles %}
{% block references %}
    {{ block.super }}
    <link rel="stylesheet" href="{% static "myStylesheet.css" %}" type="text/css">
{% endblock %}
share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather not do this because not all my pages use the "shared template". – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 3:41
1  
@steaks, How many times "shared template" is used? If it frequently used, try Victor Castillo Torres's answer. – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 3:51
    
@steaks, I updated code for case when "shared template" is rarely used. – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 3:54
    
Your answer puts the link and markup of the shared template in the references block. Doesn't that makes the shared template render incorrectly because the markup will be rendered in the head of the DOM? – Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 3:58
    
@steak, Isn't <link..> only markup in "shared template"? – falsetru Jun 21 '13 at 4:01

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