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I was only aware of dynamic proxy being used for AOP.
However,it seems it can be used for lazy loading too.
The following example from an articles is intended to demonstrate that.
However I fail to understand how this is different from a normal accessor and what exactly is being 'lazily' loaded here?
Any help in understanding what the author intended to mean by lazy-loading is appreciated.

private Category tupleToObject(Serializable[] tuple) {    
    Category category = new Category((String)tuple[1],
        (YearMonthDay) tuple[2]);
        category.setId((Long) tuple[0]);
    category.setParent(lazyGet((Long) tuple[3]));
    return category;
}


protected CategoryItf lazyGet(Long id) {    
    if (id == null) {        
    return null;    
    }    
    return (CategoryItf)Proxy.newProxyInstance( 
        CategoryItf.class.getClassLoader(),
        new Class[] { CategoryItf.class },
        new LazyLoadedObject() {
            protected Object loadObject() {
                return get(id);
            }        
    });
}


public abstract class LazyLoadedObject    implements InvocationHandler {
    private Object target;
    public Object invoke(Object proxy,
                         Method method, Object[] args)
                  throws Throwable {
        if (target == null) {
            target = loadObject();
        }
        return method.invoke(target, args);
    }
    protected abstract Object loadObject();
}

How woul this be any different from the following:

private Category tupleToObject(Serializable[] tuple) {    
    Category category = new Category((String)tuple[1],
        (YearMonthDay) tuple[2]);
        category.setId((Long) tuple[0]);
    category.setParent(get((Long) tuple[3]));
    return category;
}

In both cases,the parent is created only when needed.

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2 Answers 2

The following code snippet makes the implementation "lazy":

private Object target;
public Object invoke(Object proxy,
                     Method method, Object[] args)
              throws Throwable {
    if (target == null) {
        target = loadObject();
    }

You can see that no matter how many times you are calling this code you get the same object every time. So, practically it is singleton. However it is not created in the beginning of the program but only when it is needed first time. This is the meaning of "lazy" here.

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Edited to make my question more focussed. –  IUnknown Jun 21 '13 at 5:28
    
AlexR , I am not getting my answer, and cannot bring up my question as new, its now too down the list, please help me here.. stackoverflow.com/questions/17220399/… –  Optimus Prime Jun 21 '13 at 5:33

Let me try to explain from how I understand the code:

In this code:

private Category tupleToObject(Serializable[] tuple) {    
    Category category = new Category((String)tuple[1],
        (YearMonthDay) tuple[2]);
        category.setId((Long) tuple[0]);
    category.setParent(get((Long) tuple[3]));
    return category;
}

the get() method will directly return the actual object, hence calling tupleToObject() will populate category parent with the actual object.

while in this code:

private Category tupleToObject(Serializable[] tuple) {    
    Category category = new Category((String)tuple[1],
        (YearMonthDay) tuple[2]);
        category.setId((Long) tuple[0]);
    category.setParent(lazyGet((Long) tuple[3]));
    return category;
}

the lazyGet() method actually returns a proxy (NOT the actual object). First method call on the proxy will actually trigger the loading of the object. The proxy here is used to delay the actual retrieval of the actual object until its actually needed i.e. lazy loading.

Hope this answers your question.

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Even the 'get' will return an instance only on the first invocation?So is it any different?I can understand the dynamic loading bit - but not how 'lazy' fits in here. –  IUnknown Jun 21 '13 at 7:54
    
tupleToObject() --> get() --> loaded object. Compare it with: tupleToObject() --> lazyGet() --> PROXY. If you dont have a code that call any method on the PROXY, the actual object will never get loaded. If somewhere in your code you access the PROXY i.e. PROXY.xxx, then PROXY --> loaded object It's called lazy because it doesn't loaded directly IMHO. –  user2507946 Jun 24 '13 at 3:17

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