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Suppose I have this table:

enter image description here

What I want to happen is to move/change the column id of STATUS_DT to 10 and adjust the the rest downwards like this:

Column Name | ID

...

STAT_ID     | 10
STATUS_DT   | 10
CREA_BY     | 11
CREA_DT     | 12
LAST_UPD_BY | 13
LAST_UPD_DT | 14 

Is there a single query (ALTER TABLE) so that I can achieve this without re-creating the table?

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5  
The order of columns in a relational table is irrelevant. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 21 '13 at 8:09
3  
@a_horse_with_no_name Logically, yes, physically, no. –  wolφi Jun 21 '13 at 8:44
1  
@wolφi: it's also physically irrelevant. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 21 '13 at 8:46
1  
You can always re-arrange the order of columns in a select (or a view) therefor the physical order is not important. In the relational model the tuples (foo, bar) and (bar, foo) are identical (foo and bar being the colum names, not values) - although SQL doesn't treat them that way. Your "requirement" that those columns should come "last" is only an aesthetical requirement. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 21 '13 at 9:18
2  
I'm regularly working with databases much larger than that. And I consider it to be an aesthetical requirement. –  a_horse_with_no_name Jun 21 '13 at 11:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

In theory, you could

  1. rename the columns to be moved
  2. add new columns to the end of the column list
  3. copy data from old columns to new columns
  4. drop the old columns

In practice, I'd rename the old table and recreated it with the new column order. If need be, with an online reorg...

EDIT: For example:

01 INVOICE_REQUEST_ID
   ...
09 STAT_ID
10 CREA_BY
11 CREA_DT
12 LAST_UPD_BY
13 LAST_UPD_DT
14 STATUS_DT

Then step 1) rename the columns to be moved:

ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN crea_by     TO tmp_crea_by;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN crea_dt     TO tmp_crea_dt;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN last_upd_by TO tmp_last_upd_by;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN last_upd_dt TO tmp_last_upd_dt;

01 INVOICE_REQUEST_ID
...
09 STAT_ID
10 TMP_CREA_BY
11 TMP_CREA_DT
12 TMP_LAST_UPD_BY
13 TMP_LAST_UPD_DT
14 STATUS_DT

Step 2) Add columns to the end of the column list:

ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN crea_by     TO tmp_crea_by;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN crea_dt     TO tmp_crea_dt;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN last_upd_by TO tmp_last_upd_by;
ALTER TABLE my_table RENAME COLUMN last_upd_dt TO tmp_last_upd_dt;

01 INVOICE_REQUEST_ID
   ...
09 STAT_ID
10 TMP_CREA_BY
11 TMP_CREA_DT
12 TMP_LAST_UPD_BY
13 TMP_LAST_UPD_DT
14 STATUS_DT
15 CREA_BY
16 CREA_DT
17 LAST_UPD_BY
18 LAST_UPD_DT

Step 3) copy data from old columns to new columns:

UPDATE my_table 
   SET tmp_crea_by     = crea_by,
       tmp_crea_dt     = crea_dt,
       tmp_last_upd_by = last_upd_by,
       tmp_last_upd_dt = last_upd_dt;

Step 4) drop the old columns:

ALTER TABLE my_table SET UNUSED (tmp_crea_by, tmp_crea_dt, tmp_last_upd_by, tmp_last_upd_dt);
ALTER TABLE my_table DROP UNUSED COLUMNS;

01 INVOICE_REQUEST_ID
   ...
09 STAT_ID
10 STATUS_DT
11 CREA_BY
12 CREA_DT
13 LAST_UPD_BY
14 LAST_UPD_DT

If the data is not relevant, you can skip steps 1) rename and step 3) copy. The script would look like:

ALTER TABLE my_table SET UNUSED (crea_by, crea_dt, last_upd_by, last_upd_dt);
ALTER TABLE my_table ADD (crea_by     VARCHAR2(30));
ALTER TABLE my_table ADD (crea_dt     DATE);
ALTER TABLE my_table ADD (last_upd_by VARCHAR2(30));
ALTER TABLE my_table ADD (last_upd_dt DATE);
ALTER TABLE my_table DROP UNUSED COLUMNS;
share|improve this answer
    
Can I put this on a single file that I can run directly to the server? –  Christian Mark Jun 21 '13 at 9:14
    
Yes, of course. I split it into steps for clarity only. –  wolφi Jun 21 '13 at 9:22
    
Ah. I see so I just have to put them all in one .sql file? –  Christian Mark Jun 21 '13 at 9:50
1  
Exactly. It doesn't need to be run on the server, the DBA can execute the script from his/her client, too. –  wolφi Jun 21 '13 at 9:54
1  
I added a bounty since I use this until now.=D –  Christian Mark Sep 2 '13 at 1:11

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