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Please let me know how to get 'AA' 'BB' 'CC' from below query

declare
   type arrays1 is varray(3) of varchar2(30);
   a1 arrays1 := arrays1('A', 'B', 'C');
   type arrays2 is varray(3) of varchar2(30);
   a2 arrays2 := arrays2('A', 'B', 'C');
begin
   for i in 1..a1.count loop
      for j in 1..a2.count loop
         insert into dummy_insert  values(concat(a1(i),a2(j)));
         commit;
      end loop;
   end loop;
end;

Now I am getting 9 rows

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closed as not a real question by APC, JoseK, Florian Peschka, Ian, Sindre Sorhus Jun 24 '13 at 11:57

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Don't yell. The title is already in bold and of a larger size. –  user529758 Jun 21 '13 at 8:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

"Now I am getting 9 rows"

The outer loop steps through an array of three elements. The nested loop steps through an array of three elements for every element in the outer loop. 3 * 3 = 9.

"how to get 'AA' 'BB' 'CC' from below query"

Apply Occam's razor and discard the inner loop:

declare
   type arrays1 is varray(3) of varchar2(30);
   a1 arrays1 := arrays1('A', 'B', 'C');
begin
   for i in 1..a1.count loop
         insert into dummy_insert  values(concat(a1(i),a1(i)));
   end loop;
   commit;
end;

Please note that committing inside loops is bad practice. Obviously it doesn't make any difference with a toy piece of code like this, but if we always do the right thing we won't do the wrong thing when it actually matters.

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1  
Did you mean concat(a1(i), a1(i))? –  Bob Jarvis Jun 21 '13 at 16:38
    
@BobJarvis - of course I meant that. Well spotted! –  APC Jun 22 '13 at 8:42
1  
You've removed the second array. If removing stuff like that is an acceptable answer, why not just change the entire code to begin insert into dummy_insert values ('AA'); insert into dummy_insert values ('BB'); insert into dummy_insert values ('CC'); commit; end; ... :) –  Jeffrey Kemp Jun 24 '13 at 4:41
    
@JeffreyKemp - frankly I agree with you, but I think it's a toy question. My assumption remains that the OP is learning about Arrays, and therefore my solution is valid (and the opening paragraph is even helpful) whereas a pure SQL solution would not be instructive. I suspect Alex's solution is more likely to have applications in the real world. –  APC Jun 24 '13 at 8:23

You could just test that the values are the same:

...
  for i in 1..a1.count loop
    for j in 1..a2.count loop
      if a1(i) = a2(j) then
        insert into dummy_insert values(concat(a1(i),a2(j)));
      end if;
    end loop;
  end loop;
...

(Seems kind of pointless, but without any idea what you real-world situation is it's hard to advise how to improve the logic.)

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