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I have a class that has two public methods:

class FirstClass
{    
    public IEntity GetEntity(string byUserName);
    public IEntity GetEntity(int byUserId);
}

I want to wrap those methods with a generic class that would look like this:

class EntityHandler<T>
{
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity (T userParam)
    {
        return firstClass.GetEntity(userParam)
    }
}

Of course that wouldn't work because type of userParam is unknown at this point. How can I verify that T is int or string and then pass the argument to the suitable GetEntity() method successfully?

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6 Answers 6

Just use the is

class EntityHandler<T>
{
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity (T userParam)
    {
        if(userParam is int)
           return firstClass.GetEntity((int)(object)userParam)
        else if(userParam is string)
           return firstClass.GetEntity((string)(object)userParam)
        else 
           // add your code here
    }
}
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No, not just you also need to cast userParam so the compiler is happy. –  Bob Vale Jun 21 '13 at 9:03
    
@BobVale added :) –  WiiMaxx Jun 21 '13 at 9:05
    
@WiiMaxx I think the methods need to return something if none of the if statements are true –  Jens Kloster Jun 21 '13 at 9:06
    
@JensKloster sure but i just want to know how to verify the T type, but you are right so i added an else –  WiiMaxx Jun 21 '13 at 9:08
2  
@Wilbert as operator must be used with a reference type or nullable type int isn't either. –  Bob Vale Jun 21 '13 at 9:24
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Since you already know the allowed types, and they are not generics, why are you trying to solve the problem with generics? Just create two methods that call GetEntity with the correct type.

An alternative you can always check the typeof T and cast it to the correct type when you pass it to GetEntity:

var typeOfT = userParam.getType();
if (typeOfT == typeof(string))
{
    return firstClass.GetEntity((string) userParam); //might have to do 'userParam as string' (im duck typing)
}
else if (typeOf(T) == typeof(int))
{
    // call other GetEntity
}
else
{
    //throw
}
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The reason I don't use two methods is that it will cause re-use of code –  RiskX Jun 21 '13 at 9:07
    
You're not really re-using code, if something needs to be a particular type then you need to address that. By using generics you have to write a lot of wrapper code on each function to check for types. A proper use of generics would be if FirstClass was a generic class as well. –  Mataniko Jun 21 '13 at 9:10
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THe answer is that the generic class you want is not the best thing to do: You should create a method with two overloads, one for int and one for string:

class EntityHandler
{
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity (int userParam) { }
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity (string userParam) { }

}

other approaches, where you check the type of the passed object are prone to types other than int or string being passed at compile time, making the API unintuitive.

In situations where you were passing complex object types, rather than ints and strings, you could make them implement a base interface and use a where constraint on your generic. In this case you can't though.

Perhaps what you are really after is this:

class EntityHandler<TEntity> where TEntity : IEntity
{
    public TEntity RetrieveEntity (int userParam) { }
    public TEntity RetrieveEntity (string userParam) { }

}
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You may try the following code:

public IEntity RetrieveEntity(T userParam)
{
    FirstClass firstClass = new FirstClass();
    if (userParam is string)
        return firstClass.GetEntity((string)(object)userParam);
    else if (userParam is int)
        return firstClass.GetEntity((int)(object)userParam);
    else
        return null; // or new IEntity();
}

userParam has been typecast to object so that it converts easily to int or string or other types.

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I can't see any requirement for EntityHandler to be generic

class EntityHandler
{
    FirstClass firstClass = new FirstClass();
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity(int userParam)
    {
        return firstClass.GetEntity(userParam);
    }
    public IEntity RetrieveEntity(string userParam)
    {
        return firstClass.GetEntity(userParam);
    }
}
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Assuming java, you could use instanceof to figure out the type of the userParam variable:

if(userParam instanceof String){ 
    String param = (String) userParam;
    //yay string
} else if (userparam instanceof Integer) {
    Integer param = (Integer) userParam;
    //yay int
}

C# has the similar is operator

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1  
Great answer, but why assume Java on a C# question? :) –  Mataniko Jun 21 '13 at 9:01
    
It didn't say it was C# until 3 seconds ago –  Thom Wiggers Jun 21 '13 at 9:02
    
Simple fix replace the word instanceof with the word is –  Bob Vale Jun 21 '13 at 9:02
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