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I'm converting some old code to object literal notation in Javascript, and I'm afraid I've hit a bit of a bugbear. I know how to define properties, and I know how to define methods, but what if I want to assign the return value from a method as a property?

I've supplied code with the error output from Chrome's console. I can't see what I'm doing wrong, but the console is telling me that I'm either trying to go to something nonexistent in the global scope, or just something nonexistent. Here it is:

Code:

var testobj = {
    a: 2,
    b: 4,
    c: function() {
        return this.a * this.b;
    },
    d: this.c(), // OK, got it, it's trying to call it from global scope. Fine.
    e: function() {
        if (this.d) {
            console.log("SUCCESS");
            console.log(this.d);
        } else {
            console.log("ERROR");
        }
    }
}

Error:

TypeError: Object [object global] has no method 'c'

New code:

var testobj = {
    a: 2,
    b: 4,
    c: function() {
        return this.a * this.b;
    },
    d: testobj.c(), // but if I change it like this, it still doesn't work. What gives?
    e: function() {
        if (this.d) {
            console.log("SUCCESS");
            console.log(this.d);
        } else {
            console.log("ERROR");
        }
    }
}

New error:

TypeError: Cannot call method 'c' of undefined

Can anyone see what I'm doing wrong?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can fix it by using:

var testobj = {
    a: 2,
    b: 4,
    c: function() {
        return this.a * this.b;
    },
    d: function() {
        return this.c();
    },
    e: function() {
        if (this.d) {
            console.log("SUCCESS");
            console.log(this.d);
        } else {
            console.log("ERROR");
        }
    }
}

When you do d: this.c(), this is actually the global object. This is because, at the time of creating your testobj, the scope is the global object, so this is the global object.

If you use

d: function() {
    return this.c();
}

you're just setting testobj.c to a certain function. The this inside that function is only evaluated when you call d. So when you do call d, it will check the scope and see that the scope is testobj. And as testobj has a c function, it wall call and return that.

I've put this in a jsFiddle to see it in action.

share|improve this answer

This works ((http://jsfiddle.net/balintbako/n6YjE/):

var testobj = {
    a: 2,
    b: 4,
    c: function () {
        alert(this.a + this.b);
    },
    d: function () {
        this.c();
    }
};

testobj.c();
share|improve this answer

I believe you want to see the return value of the c in d.

In this cases I assign d after the object as it doesn t have any instance in var ob = {...} as it is still being created.

var testobj = {
    a: 2,
    b: 4,
    c: function() {
        return this.a * this.b;
    },
    e: function() {
        if (this.d) {
            console.log("SUCCESS");
            console.log(this.d);
        } else {
            console.log("ERROR");
        }
    }
}

testobj.d = testobj.c();

alert(testobj.d);
alert(testobj.c());
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, if you change a or b, c will change, but d won't. This might be what you want, or not. Just something to keep in mind. –  Peter Jun 21 '13 at 9:44
    
yes I thought this is what OP asked otherwise why he would define two exactly same property obj.c() == obj.d() will always return same. But in this case he can do if (obj.c() != obj.d ) alert("changed"); trigger change function. –  Onur TOPAL Jun 21 '13 at 9:47
    
aha, true, I hadn't looked at it like that. –  Peter Jun 21 '13 at 9:59

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