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I developed a JavaScript monthly calendar, and all the HTML is dynamically generated by the script.
The advantage is that, prior the inclusion of JS and CSS files, the HTML only needs a container:

<div id="calendar-box"></div>

Inside it, the script appends the calendar, which is a table with a thead, a tbody and a tfoot section.

The tbody simply displays the grid of days, so there's nothing to be localised. The thead and tfoot contains objects for user interaction (links to move to the previous or next month/year, the weekday names and the link to close the calendar).

JavaScript monthly calendar preview

As you can imagine, thead and tfoot may differ for each localisation: in English weekdays are "Mo, Tu, We, Th, Fr, Sa, Su", while in spanish they would be "Lu, Ma, Mi, Ju, Vi, Sa, Do".
The same problem comes up for the month names.

As far as now, I solve this with a config option which defines arrays of months, weekdays and other template parts:

config = {
    // other config stuff...  
    monthNames: ['January', 'February', 'March', 'April', 'May', 'June', 'July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November', 'December'],
    weekDayNames: ['Mo', 'Tu', 'We', 'Th', 'Fr', 'Sa', 'Su'],
    closeText: 'Close' // text to display in the "close" button
};

but it does not seem to me the best solution; I usually tend to reduce the LOCALE in JavaScript as far as I can. Besides this, the thead incurs in a lot of JavaScript-generated HTML, which is not so nice, too.

I saw in similar questions that somebody suggested to use a JavaScript templating plugin:

var t = $.template('<div><img src="${url}" />${name}</div>');

but it is still a JS-generated HTML; in this case it is provided as a parameter to the template method.
So, I am evaluating to make the script generate the only tbody section, which is where the logic part works most, and providing a static HTML portion of the rest of the table right into the page, with something like this:

<table class="calendar">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <td colspan="2"><a href="#">&larr;</a></td>
            <td colspan="3">
                <div class="month">June</div><div class="year">2013</div>
            </td>
            <td colspan="2"><a href="#">&lrarr;</a></td>
        </tr>
        <tr class="weekDays">
            <td>Mo</td><td>Tu</td><td>We</td><td>Th</td><td>Fr</td><td>Sa</td><td>Su</td>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <!-- only this part is filled by JavaScript -->
    </tbody>
    <tfoot>
        <tr><td colspan="7"><a href="#">Close</a></td></tr>
    </tfoot>
</table>

It is a hybrid solution, but allows to manage LOCALEs through the server-side templating. What are your opinions about it?

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closed as not constructive by Pete, Danubian Sailor, Oleg V. Volkov, khr055, karthikr Jun 21 '13 at 15:04

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

It is a thin line between performance and usability. The more javascript you use the more complex it gets for the client. The more hard-coded approaches and multi-file solutions you choose the more complex and messy it might get for you to maintain everything. Computing power is generally no issue anymore but then again we have all those mobile and tablet clients with sometimes outdated OSes and browsers. If you want to support all of them I'd use as few javascript as possible.

If your calendar only shows in one place and never changes its location or appearance I'd suggest to hard-code it and then only change the LOCALEs depending on what language the user chose. If you use php you can do this by simply including the desired language file with the correct configuration just like in your javascript approach and then directly put the variables where ever you want them. If the opposite is the case write a solely javascript based module to generate the calendar and include one javascript LOCALE file server-side with php and then work with it.

language-EN.php:

<?php
  return array(
    "monthNames" => array('January', 'February', 'March', 'April', 'May', 'June', 'July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November', 'December'),
    "weekDayNames" => array('Mo', 'Tu', 'We', 'Th', 'Fr', 'Sa', 'Su'),
    "closeText" => 'Close' // text to display in the "close" button
  );
?>

index.php

<?php
  $LOCALES = include("language-EN.php");
?>

...

<table class="calendar">
<thead>
    <tr>
        <td colspan="2"><a href="#">&larr;</a></td>
        <td colspan="3">
            <div class="month">June</div><div class="year">2013</div>
        </td>
        <td colspan="2"><a href="#">&lrarr;</a></td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="weekDays">
        <td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][0] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][1] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][2] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][3] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][4] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][5] ?></td><td><?php echo $LOCALES['weekDayNames'][6] ?></td>
    </tr>

...
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