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This is something now more of curiosity than actual purpose. If you have a SqlConnection opened and attach a SqlDataReader to it, and then try to run another query using the same SqlConnection then it will throw an error. My question is how does the SqlConnection know that a reader is attached to it. There is not a public property or anything for HasDataReader, so how does the SqlConnection class know?


Original Question: (which is no longer relevant)

Hi, I'm setting up a little thing for connection pooling and on of the more common bugs that we have occur(its always an easy fix, but we just can't remember reader.Close()!) it is when we have a connection that is used by a lot of classes/methods and one method opens a data reader and forgets to close it. This isn't really bad cause a lot of times all you have to do is go into the debugger and go up one level and see the function before it was and check if it had an unclosed data reader.

Now, here is the bigger problem. In this connection pool, if a datareader is open, then it's not known until a thread gets a connection and tries to use it and the thing that originally opened the data reader may no longer even be alive.

So quite simply, how can you detect if a data reader is open on a connection and is there a way to close the reader without closing the connection?

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Just to check - you're not trying to write your own connection pooling mechanism are you? Connection pooling is already handled under the covers by the framework; you don't need to do anything about it yourself. – Greg Beech Nov 12 '09 at 16:36
2  
Wow.. I actually did not know that it provided connection pooling.. I guess it's so implicit and so little you have to do to enable it that I missed it.. this question is no longer relevant then. – Earlz Nov 12 '09 at 17:20
    
@earlz - all the better! See this for details: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8xx3tyca.aspx. – Jeff Sternal Nov 12 '09 at 21:16

11 Answers 11

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+150

how does the SqlConnection know that a reader is attached to it

As far as I can see, the SQLConnection knows that it has a reader attached to it because it maintains a reference to it internally.

A judicious use of Reflector shows that the SQLConnection object has a private field of type DBConnectionInternal, which is filled with one of a number of concrete implementations of this abstract class. When you try to add a second live reader to the connection the method 'ValidateConnectionForExecute' is called on the internal connection, and this traces through to an examination of an internal 'ReferenceCollection'. When this reveals an existing live reader, an exception is thrown.

I guess, if you wanted, you could dig all this out yourself at runtime with reflection.

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+1, most likely the OP won't get a more accurate, to-the-point answer than this one. – stakx Jul 16 '10 at 20:50
    
+1 good answer - all due respect to @Joel and his advice, but this actually answers the question. – slugster Jul 18 '10 at 13:03
    
FWIW, the full path to the data reader is Connection.[Private]_innerConnection.[Private]ReferenceCollection.[Private]_ite‌​ms[i].Target, where [Private] indicates non-public fields/properties and i is an index – Arithmomaniac Mar 23 '15 at 13:42

The way to make sure you close your datareaders (and database connections) is to always open them in a using block, like so:

using (SqlDataReader rdr = MySqlCommandObject.ExecuteReader())
{
    while (rdr.Read())
    {
        //...
    }
} // The SqlDataReader is guaranteed to be closed here, even if an exception was thrown.
share|improve this answer
    
This is the way we do it as well. It's important to note that this will only work for .NET 2.0 and greater. If you're using an earlier version you will want to use a Try/Finally block and ensure the .Close() method gets called in the Finally block and be sure to check for a null reference before calling Close(). – Sonny Boy Nov 12 '09 at 15:59
3  
Thats all fine and well, but doesn't answer my question. We have started doing using blocks but we still have old code which doesn't. When maintaining that code it's possible something may happen so that the reader doesn't get closed. How can we detect that and throw an error? – Earlz Nov 12 '09 at 16:10
2  
So you don't want to change your old to make it right, and instead add a bunch of new code to detect wrong-ness? That's kinda backward. – Joel Coehoorn Nov 12 '09 at 16:55
    
Maybe so but it is a lot of code to redo and doing a using block is not so trivial in certain cases. When you try to do something on a connection that has an open data reader it throws an error. SqlConnection knows nothing of SqlDataReader so my question is how does that error get thrown and how can I detect it will get thrown without doing a dummy command? – Earlz Nov 12 '09 at 17:12
    
Actually, on my Windows XP machine with .NET Framework 3.5, invoking Dispose (which happens automatically at the end up a using block) will not close the IDataReader. It seems its Close method should always be called explicitly, e.g. in a finally block. – stakx Jul 14 '10 at 22:57

Nobody really answered earlz's question. ("Why are you doing it that way?" isn't an answer.) I think the answer is that you can't tell whether a connection has an open data reader associated with it just by looking at the connection itself. The connection doesn't expose any property that will tell you that. Opening a connection sets its State property to ConnectionState.Open. Opening a data reader on it doesn't change the connection state. State values like ConnectionState.Fetching are used only while data operations such as SqlDataReader.Read() are in progress. When the connection is just sitting there between Reads the connection state is just Open. So to determine when an open reader is using the connection you have to check the states of the readers that might be using it.

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how can a datareader mark a connection as "opened datareader though"? There are no publically accessible methods or fields, so how does a datareader tell a connection to throw an error if something else tries to use it. Thats what I'm not understanding is where in the SqlConnection/SqlCommand code does it detect an open datareader – Earlz Nov 17 '09 at 14:35
2  
While Joel doesn't "answer" the question, he gives the correct way of doing things. Especially in the fact of the face of the complexity of solving it the wrong way vs the correct solution, I would by very disapproving (read, written warning in file) of any employee who tried such a hackish solution instead of just a USING block. – Godeke Dec 20 '09 at 18:11
1  
I had the same question, this is the exact answer I was looking for. I have a reusable generic DAL where an externally instantiated connection object gets passed in as a parameter and I needed to determine if it was reusable or not. – stimpy77 Jul 15 '10 at 12:23
    
Also, sometimes we are not at liberty to do things the correct way. Sometimes we are stuck with the wrong way (because of closed dependencies, etc) and we have to make do with what we have. Stack Overflow answers should at least try answer the question first before describing how the the world should work to begin with. – stimpy77 Jul 15 '10 at 13:05

wow.. Lots of people not answering the question! The thing that no one is mentioning is multi-threaded applications. I think everyone here gets the fact that you must close the reader, but what I don't seemed to see anyone addressing is the fact that the reader may not be finished when the next request comes in. For example.. I have a table that is filled through a separate thread so that I preserve UI interaction. It would be nice to have the second third and fourth threads wait while the connection is in use. Then when it frees up do it business. Without a clean cut way for determining the whether the connection has a reader attached to it, I have to spend several minutes creating some sort of static boolean flag system for every reader in every class that MIGHT want to use the connection. A lot more complex than need be

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and then try to run another query using the same SqlConnection then it will throw an error.

of course, you could enable Multiple Active Result Sets - then it doesn't throw. There are some limitations of course (aren't there always?), but it'll work. Of course, this is only intended for nesting operations. If the problem is that you have accidentally left something open (that you should have closed already), then the answer is (as already stated) using.

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To avoid this, wrap your DataReader in a using block, this will guarantee that it disposes the connection like so:

using (IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader())
{
      //do stuff
}

There's a property on IDataReader called IsClosed which will tell you its state.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to tell if a data reader is open from only the connection. We will not have the data reader in our reach from the code that should check this. – Earlz Nov 12 '09 at 16:11
    
Take a look at the ConnectionState enum on SqlConnection, I am not certain but either ConnectionState.Fetching or ConnectionState.Executing may give you what you want. However if you don't have a reference to the DataReader itself, you'll be hard pressed to clean it up without closing the connection itself and reopening (at least to my knowledge). Also, are you using one connection reference throughout the entire app? – Jason Ruckman Nov 12 '09 at 16:25

Check if it's open, and if so, close it. Heads-up, if you are using the SqlHelper class this is a bug - it doesn't close the connection in some scenarios. Solution is to use either try/catch or using blocks in your code, depending on whether you're pre-2.0 or not.

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You can use delegates too, if for any reason you can't use the using clausule, heres an example of how to accomplish that:

public delegate void TransactionRunner(DbConnection sender, DbTransaction trans, object state);

public void RunTransaction(TransactionRunner runner, object state)
    {
        RunTransaction(runner, IsolationLevel.ReadCommitted, state);
    }

public void RunTransaction(TransactionRunner runner, IsolationLevel il, object state)
    {

        DbConnection cn = GetConnection from pool
        DbTransaction trans = null;

        try
        {  
            trans = cn.BeginTransaction(il);
            runner(cn, trans, state);
            trans.Commit();
        }
        catch (Exception err)
        {
            if (trans != null)
                trans.Rollback();
            throw err;
        }
        finally
        {
            //Here you can close anything that was left open
        }
    }

Then when you need to use this just use the function and pass the function as

public void DoStuff(){
    TransactionRunner tr = new TransactionRunner(MyFunction);
    RunTransaction(tr, <a parameter>);
}
public void DoStuffInternal(DbConnection cn, DbTransaction trans, object state){
    //Do Stuff and Im sure that the transaction will commit or rollback
}

This seems like an overkill now in .Net 3.5 but this was how we did it back then in .Net 1.0... Hope it helps...

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Today I also came across in the same situation but... no luck in the web.

So, I wrote the below code to find if a reader is opened in a connection or generally find if a connection is ready to be used:

private bool IsConnectionReady(SqlConnection Connection)
{
    bool nRet = true;

    try
    {
        String sql = "SELECT * FROM dummy_table";

        using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand(sql, Connection))
        {
            using (SqlDataReader rdr = cmd.ExecuteReader())
            { }
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        nRet = false;
    }

    return nRet;
}

The "dummy_table" is an empty dummy table in my db to check accessibility.

This is just a workaround but I should make things work and be able to check connection availability in any case.

So, I hope it helps you.

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According to the article, you should always close the reader after you're done, even if you use a using block. A using block will close a connection, but will not close a reader. Why the inconsistency? Beats me.

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just stumbled across this old question. Found an article about accomplishing this via reflection:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dataaccesstechnologies/archive/2009/04/08/how-to-find-out-the-data-reader-referencing-an-ado-net-connection-object-to-fix-the-error-there-is-already-an-open-datareader-associated-with-this-command-which-must-be-closed-first.aspx

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1  
Please don't post links to resources without adding the relevant content to your answer. If that link stops working then your answer would be useless to future visitors. – Brandon Feb 25 '15 at 18:01

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