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How does generic lambda work (auto keyword as an argument type) in C++14 standard?

Is it based on C++ templates where for each different argument type compiler generates a new function with the same body but replaced types (compile-time polymorphism) or is it more similar to Java's generics (type erasure)?

Code example:

auto glambda = [](auto a) { return a; };
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Fixed to C++14, originally used C++11 in question –  sasha.sochka Jul 8 '13 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Generic lambdas are not part of C++11. They will be introduced with C++14.

Simply, the closure type defined by the lambda expression will have a templated call operator rather than the regular, non-template call operator of C++11's lambdas (of course, when auto appears at least once in the parameter list).

So your example:

auto glambda = [] (auto a) { return a; };

Will make glambda an instance of this type:

class /* unnamed */
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    T operator () (T a) const { return a; }
};

Paragraph 5.1.2/5 of the C++14 Standard Draft n3690 specifies how the call operator of the closure type of a given lambda expression is defined:

The closure type for a non-generic lambda-expression has a public inline function call operator (13.5.4) whose parameters and return type are described by the lambda-expression’s parameter-declaration-clause and trailing-return-type respectively. For a generic lambda, the closure type has a public inline function call operator member template (14.5.2) whose template-parameter-list consists of one invented type template-parameter for each occurrence of auto in the lambda’s parameter-declaration-clause, in order of appearance. The invented type template-parameter is a parameter pack if the corresponding parameter-declaration declares a function parameter pack (8.3.5). The return type and function parameters of the function call operator template are derived from the lambda-expression’s trailing-return-type and parameter-declarationclause by replacing each occurrence of auto in the decl-specifiers of the parameter-declaration-clause with the name of the corresponding invented template-parameter.

Finally:

Is it similar to templates where for each different argument type compiler generates functions with the same body but changed types or is it more similar to Java's generics?

As the above paragraph explains, generic lambdas are just syntactic sugar for unique, unnamed functors with a templated call operator. That should answer your question :)

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5  
However, they also allow a locally defined class with a template method. Which is new. –  Yakk Jun 21 '13 at 12:14
2  
@Yakk: Wasn't the restriction for function-local templates dropped altogether with C++11 already? –  phresnel Jul 17 '13 at 7:13
2  
@phresnel: Nope, that restriction has not been lifted –  Andy Prowl Jul 17 '13 at 9:04
1  
@AndyProwl: I realise my mistake. What was lifted indeed was using local types as template arguments (as in int main () { struct X {}; std::vector<X> x; }) –  phresnel Jul 17 '13 at 10:22
1  
@phresnel: Right, that has changed indeed –  Andy Prowl Jul 17 '13 at 13:48

Unfortunately, they are not part of C++11 (http://ideone.com/NsqYuq):

auto glambda = [](auto a) { return a; };

int main() {}

With g++ 4.7:

prog.cpp:1:24: error: parameter declared ‘auto’
...

However, the way it might be implemented in C++14 as per the Portland proposal for generic lambdas:

[](const& x, & y){ return x + y; }

This would yield for the biggest part the usual creation of an anonymous functor class, but with the lack of types the compiler would emit a templated member-operator():

struct anonymous
{
    template <typename T, typename U>
    auto operator()(T const& x, U& y) const -> decltype(x+y)
    { return x + y; }
};

Or as per the newer proposal Proposal for Generic (Polymorphic) Lambda Expressions

auto L = [](const auto& x, auto& y){ return x + y; };

--->

struct /* anonymous */
{
    template <typename T, typename U>
    auto operator()(const T& x, U& y) const // N3386 Return type deduction
    { return x + y; }
} L;

So yes, for every permutation of parameters, a new instantiation would arise, however, the members of that functor would still be shared (i.e. the captured arguments).

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3  
That proposal to allow dropping the type-specifier is utterly grotesque. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 16 '13 at 14:23
    
They went in with g++-4.9. You need to supply -std=c++1y. –  emsr May 13 at 13:21
    
I didn't realize ideone doesn't have gcc-4.9 and C++14 yet. –  emsr May 13 at 16:42
    
question : does this auto has the same deduction rules than the classic auto ? If we refer to the templated analogy, it would mean the auto is not auto, it is the same rules as template type deduction. Then the question is : is template deduction equivalent to auto ? –  v.oddou Dec 9 at 3:37
    
@v.oddou: "Classic auto" is good. To me, "classic auto" means "Stack Variable", and was once used in contrast to static or register :) Anyways, yes, using auto there means that under the hood, a normal template is generated. In fact, a lambda will be replaced compiler-internally by a functor class, and a auto parameter means that template <T> ... (T ...) will be emitted. –  phresnel Dec 9 at 9:26

It's a proposed C++14 feature (not in C++11) similar (or even equivalent) to templates. For instance, N3559 provides this example:

For example, this generic lambda-expression containing statement:

auto L = [](const auto& x, auto& y){ return x + y; };

might result in the creation of a closure type, and object that behaves similar to the struct below:

struct /* anonymous */
{
    template <typename T, typename U>
    auto operator()(const T& x, U& y) const // N3386 Return type deduction
    { return x + y; }
} L;
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