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I want to return the number of duplicate values in a sorted array.

For example: a = { 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4 }, fratelli(n) should return 2. (They are 1, 1 and 4, 4)

I attempted to use a recursive approach, but it doesn't work. It Always give me 4.

I'm asking if someone please could help me understand better this methods of programming. Thanks a lot!

The function:

    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;

    int fratelli(int a[], int l, int r)
    {
        if (l == r) return 0;
        else 
        {
            int c = (l+r) / 2;
            int n = fratelli(a, l, c) + fratelli(a, c+1, r);
            if (a[l] == a[l+1]) n++;
            return n;
        }

    }


    int main()
    {
        const int _N = 11;
        int array[_N] = { 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 5, 7, 8, 8, 11, 12 };

        cout << "\n" << fratelli(array, 0, _N-1);


        return 0;
    } 
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2  
if you have a = {1,1,1} should it return 2 or 1? –  Infested Jun 21 '13 at 11:02
1  
Don't use _N for a variable name. Names beginning with an underscore and an upper-case letter are reserved for the implementation. –  Marcelo Cantos Jun 21 '13 at 11:06
    
Are You sure You want to use recursion? If I have understood it right, recursion makes the problem more difficult. –  gkovacs90 Jun 21 '13 at 11:06
    
@gkovacs90 Yes because it is an exercise :) There isn't specified about that behaviour... Let's consider the simpler way, so it should return 2 (considering Infested comment) –  misiMe Jun 21 '13 at 11:07
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have an error on this line:

if (a[l] == a[l+1]) n++;

The check should be at index c not at l. Apart from this your code seems alright to me.

share|improve this answer
    
how will it change it? so instead of checking from left, itll check from right. –  Infested Jun 21 '13 at 11:04
    
@Infested no this checks if the two elements at the split are equal so that OP does not miss a pair split over the two partitions. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jun 21 '13 at 11:05
    
It works! Can you please give me a little explaination of that? –  misiMe Jun 21 '13 at 11:06
    
even better, might end up over-counting –  Infested Jun 21 '13 at 11:06
    
@tuttoscorre does my comment above make it clear? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jun 21 '13 at 11:06
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