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I have two threads which use two different functions. First one to search from start to end and the second one to search from end to start.

Now I'm using Thread.Sleep(10) for synchronisation, but it takes too much time, and testing is not possible in such condition.

Any idea how can I sync two threads with different functions?

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There are many ways to make synchronization and parallel calcs. Could you describe your algorithm, what data needs to be shared between threads? –  gabba Jun 21 '13 at 11:38
    
What result from function you need to get? –  gabba Jun 21 '13 at 11:39
    
I think that what you need is a Semaphore –  ees_cu Jun 22 '13 at 14:45
    
Semaphore did the trick! –  RustyIguana Jun 24 '13 at 6:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It depends slightly on what you want to do.

  • If you have two threads and you just want to exit one when the other reaches "success" (or n threads and you want to exit them all when one reaches "success" first) you just need to periodically check for success on each thread.
    • Use Interlocked to do this without locks, or some other mechanism (see below)
    • Use cancellable Task objects
  • If you need to do your search in phases, where each thread does something and then waits for the other to catch up, you need a different approach.
    • Use Barrier

Given that you are doing an A*-search you likely need a combination of all two/three anyway:

  • Barrier to coordinate the steps and update the open set between steps
  • Success signalling to work out when to exit threads if another thread succeeded
  • Task objects with CancellationToken to allow callers to cancel the search.

Another answer suggested Semaphore - this is not really suitable for your needs (see comments below).

Barrier can be used for searches such as this by:

  • enter step 0 of the algorithm
  • n threads split the current level into equal parts and work on each half, when each completes then it signals and waits for the other thread
  • when all threads are ready, proceed to the next step and repeat the search

Simple check for exit - Interlocked

The first part is checking for success. If you want to stay "lockless", you can use Interlocked to do this, the general pattern is:

// global success indicator
private const int NotDone = 0;
private const int AllDone = 1;
private int _allDone = NotDone;

private GeneralSearchFunction(bool directionForward) {
  bool iFoundIt = false;
  ... do some search operations that won't take much time
  if (iFoundIt) {
    // set _allDone to AllDone!
    Interlocked.Exchange(ref _allDone, AllDone);
    return;
  }
  ... do more work
  // after one or a few iterations, if this thread is still going
  //   see if another thread has set _allDone to AllDone
  if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _allDone, NotDone, NotDone) == AllDone) {
    return; // if they did, then exit
  }
  ... loop to the top and carry on working
}

// main thread:
  Thread t1 = new Thread(() => GeneralSearchFunction(true));
  Thread t2 = new Thread(() => GeneralSearchFunction(false));
  t1.Start(); t2.Start(); // start both
  t1.Join(); t2.Join(); 
  // when this gets to here, one of them will have succeeded

This is the general pattern for any kind of success or cancellation token:

  • do some work
  • if you succeed, set a signal every other thread checks periodically
  • if you haven't yet succeeded then in the middle of that work, either every iteration, or every few iterations, check to see if this thread should exit

So an implementation would look like:

class Program
{
    // global success indicator
    private const int NotDone = 0;
    private const int AllDone = 1;
    private static int _allDone = NotDone;

    private static int _forwardsCount = 0;    // counters to simulate a "find"
    private static int _backwardsCount = 0;   // counters to simulate a "find"
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        var searchItem = "foo";
        Thread t1 = new Thread(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchForwards, searchItem));
        Thread t2 = new Thread(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchBackwards, searchItem));
        t1.Start(); t2.Start();
        t1.Join(); t2.Join();
        Console.WriteLine("all done");
    }
    private static void DoSearchWithBarrier(Func<string, bool> searchMethod, string searchItem) {
        while (!searchMethod(searchItem)) {
            // after one or a few iterations, if this thread is still going
            //   see if another thread has set _allDone to AllDone
            if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _allDone, NotDone, NotDone) == AllDone) {
                return; // if they did, then exit
            }
        }
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref _allDone, AllDone);
    }
    public static bool SearchForwards(string item) {
        //  return true if we "found it", false if not
        return (Interlocked.Increment(ref _forwardsCount) == 10);
    }
    public static bool SearchBackwards(string item) {
        //  return true if we "found it", false if not
        return (Interlocked.Increment(ref _backwardsCount) == 20); // make this less than 10 to find it backwards first
    }
}

Using Tasks to the same end

Of course, this wouldn't be .NET 4.5 without using Task:

class Program
{
    private static int _forwardsCount = 0;    // counters to simulate a "find"
    private static int _backwardsCount = 0;   // counters to simulate a "find"
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        var searchItem = "foo";
        var tokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();
        var allDone = tokenSource.Token;
        Task t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchForwards, searchItem, tokenSource, allDone), allDone);
        Task t2 = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchBackwards, searchItem, tokenSource, allDone), allDone);
        Task.WaitAll(new[] {t2, t2});
        Console.WriteLine("all done");
    }
    private static void DoSearchWithBarrier(Func<string, bool> searchMethod, string searchItem, CancellationTokenSource tokenSource, CancellationToken allDone) {
        while (!searchMethod(searchItem)) {
            if (allDone.IsCancellationRequested) {
                return;
            }
        }
        tokenSource.Cancel();
    }
    ...
}

However, now you have used the CancellationToken for the wrong things - really this should be kept for the caller of the search to cancel the search, so you should use CancellationToken to check for a requested cancellation (only the caller needs tokenSource then), and a different success synchronisation (such as the Interlocked sample above) to exit.

Phase/step synchronisation

This gets harder for many reasons, but there is a simple approach. Using Barrier (new to .NET 4) in conjunction with an exit signal you can:

  1. Perform the assigned thread's work for the current step, and then wait for the other thread to catch up before doing another iteration
  2. Exit both threads when one succeeds

There are many different approaches for thread sync, depending on exactly what you want to achieve. Some are:

  • Barrier: This is probably the most suitable if you are intending for both your forwards and backwards searches to run at the same time. It also screams out your intent, i.e. "all threads can't go on until they everyone reaches a barrier"
  • ManualResetEvent - when one thread releases a signal, all others can proceed until it is set again. AutoResetEvent is similar, except it only allows one thread to proceed before blocking again.
  • Interlocked - in combination with SpinWait this is a viable lockless solution
  • Semaphore - possible to use, but not really suited for your scenario

I have only provided a full sample for Barrier here as it seems the most suitable in your case. Barrier is one of the most performant, second only to ManualResetEventSlim (ref. albahari), but using ManualResetEvent will need more complex code.

Other techniques to look at, if none of the above work for you are Monitor.Wait and Monitor.Pulse (now you're using locking) and Task Continuations. The latter is more used for passing data from one async operation to another, but it could be used for your scenario. And, as with the samples at the top of the answer, you are more likely to combine Task with Barrier than use one instead of the other. Task Continuations could be used to do the post-step revision of the open set in the A*-search, but you can just as easily use Barrier for that anyway.

This code, using Barrier works. In essence, DoSearchWithBarrier is the only bit doing the synchronisation - all the rest is setup and teardown code.

class Program {
    ...
    private static int _forwardsCount = 0;    // counters to simulate a "find"
    private static int _backwardsCount = 0;   // counters to simulate a "find"
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        Barrier barrier = new Barrier(numThreads, 
            b => Console.WriteLine("Completed search iteration {0}", b.CurrentPhaseNumber));
        var searchItem = "foo";
        Thread t1 = new Thread(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchForwards, searchItem, barrier));
        Thread t2 = new Thread(() => DoSearchWithBarrier(SearchBackwards, searchItem, barrier));
        t1.Start(); Console.WriteLine("Started t1");
        t2.Start(); Console.WriteLine("Started t2");
        t1.Join(); Console.WriteLine("t1 done");
        t2.Join(); Console.WriteLine("t2 done");
        Console.WriteLine("all done");
    }
    private static void DoSearchWithBarrier(Func<string, bool> searchMethod, string searchItem, Barrier barrier) {
        while (!searchMethod(searchItem)) {
            // while we haven't found it, wait for the other thread to catch up
            barrier.SignalAndWait(); // check for the other thread AFTER the barrier
            if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _allDone, NotDone, NotDone) == AllDone) {
                return;
            }
        }
        // set success signal on this thread BEFORE the barrier
        Interlocked.Exchange(ref _allDone, AllDone);
        // wait for the other thread, and then exit (and it will too)
        barrier.SignalAndWait();
    }
    ...
}

There are two things going on here:

  • Barrier is used to synchronise the two threads so they can't do their next step until the other has caught up
  • The exit signal uses Interlocked, as I first described.

Implementing this for A* searches is very similar to the above sample. Once all threads reach the barrier and therefore continue you could use a ManualResetEvent or a simple lock to then let one (and only one) revise the open set.

A note on Semaphore

This is probably not what you want as it's most often used when you have a limited pool of resources, with more resource users requiring access than you have resources.

Think of the PlayStation with CoD on it in the corner of the work canteen - 4 controllers, 20 people waiting (WaitOne) to use it, as soon as your character dies you Release the controller and someone else takes your place. No particular FIFO/LIFO ordering is enforced, and in fact Release can be called by the bouncer you employ to prevent the inevitable fights (i.e. thread identity is not enforced).

Simple check for exit - other approaches

Use of lock for simple success indication

You can achieve the same with locking. Both Interlocked and lock ensure you don't see any memory cache issues with reading a common variable between threads:

private readonly object _syncAllDone = new object();
...
  if (iFoundIt) {
    lock (_syncAllDone) { _allDone = AllDone };
    return;
  }
  ...
  //   see if another thread has set _allDone to AllDone
  lock (_syncAllDone) {
    if (_allDone == AllDone) {
      return; // if they did, then exit
    }
  }

The disadvantage of this is that locking may well be slower, but you need to test for your situation. The advantage is that if you are using lock anyway to do other things such as writing out results from your thread, you don't have any extra overhead.

Use of ManualResetEvent for simple success indication

This is not really the intended use of reset events, but it can work. (If using .NET 4 or later, use ManualResetEventSlim instead of ManualResetEvent):

private ManualResetEvent _mreAllDone = new ManualResetEvent(true); // will not block a thread
...
  if (iFoundIt) {
    _mreAllDone.Reset(); // stop other threads proceeding
    return;
  }
  ...
  //   see if another thread has reset _mreAllDone by testing with a 0 timeout
  if (!_mreAllDone.WaitOne(0)) {
      return; // if they did, then exit
  }

Phase synchronisation - other approaches

All of the other approaches get a lot more complex, as you have to do two-way continuation checks to prevent race conditions and permanently blocked threads. I don't recommend them, so I won't provide a sample here (it would be long and complicated).


References:

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indeed this is a nice answer. –  Chavoosh Dec 13 '13 at 7:44
thread.Join() 

is possibly what your after. This will make your current thread block until the other thread ends.

It's possible to Join multiple threads there by syncing all of them to one point.

List<Thread> threads = new List<Thread>();
threads.Add(new Thread(new ThreadStart(<Actual method here>)));
threads.Add(new Thread(new ThreadStart(<Another method here>)));
threads.Add(new Thread(new ThreadStart(<Another method here>)));

foreach(Thread thread in threads)
{
  thread.Start();
}
//All your threads are now running
foreach(Thread thread in threads)
{
  thread.Join();
}
//You wont get here until all those threads have finished
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Well i've tried Thread.Join(), but I dont want to stop the first thread, I only want to pause it for the time, that second thread finds next node. –  RustyIguana Jun 22 '13 at 9:09
    
Your question didn't really explain that. Either a lock or a ManualReset (or any kind of signal) will get this done. There is now an outstanding answer below that covers this. –  scott barbary Jun 24 '13 at 9:37

In some cases You can use AutoResetEvent to wait some result from thread. You can use Task's for start/stop/wait result of some workers. You can use Producer/Consumer pattern with BlockingCollection in case your functions eat some data and returns collection of something.

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