Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is my very first question on SO and I'm confused there isn't a similar question yet!

So the question is:

Why doesn't try-with-resources work with field variables?

Or in other words: Why do I always need a local variable for that?

Here goes some example code:

public class FileWriteTest {

    public FileWriter file;

    public void workingDemo() {

        try(FileWriter file = new FileWriter(new File("someFilePath")) {
            // do something
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

    public void notWorkingDemo() {

        file = null;

        try(file = new FileWriter(new File("someFilePath")) {
            // do something
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }

}

May anyone explain me why there is this convention?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

An instance variable may be changed at any point during the execution of the try-with-resources block. This would break its invariant and prevent the cleanup. Note that the local variable is implictly final, for the same reason.

BTW a better question is, why does Java force us to declare a local variable, even if we don't refer to it within the block. C#, for example, doesn't require this.

share|improve this answer

I suspect the designers considered using a field a bad idea as this allow the object to escape the region of usage. i.e. it is only valid in the try block so you shouldn't be able to access it anywhere else.

share|improve this answer
2  
It can escape this way, too. The point is having a final variable which is guaranteed to hold the same value until the end of the try-with-resources. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 21 '13 at 12:37
1  
@MarkoTopolnik Are try fields implicitly made final? –  Peter Lawrey Jun 21 '13 at 12:38
2  
Yes, just tried it. The variables declared in try-with-resources are implicitly final. Specifically, Eclipse gives this error: "The resource <var-name> of a try-with-resources statement cannot be assigned". Not the same as for the final variable. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 21 '13 at 12:39
1  
@MarkoTopolnik I didn't know that. It makes sense. Then again I would have preferred variables is implicitly final unless a keyword was used to make them non-final. e.g. var –  Peter Lawrey Jun 21 '13 at 12:42
1  
They'd almost certainly leave their vars final, except those they specifically need to change. In addition to that, it would probably discourage idioms involving mutable vars. It's unbelievable how much less cognitive strain I get from code with final vars! –  Marko Topolnik Jun 21 '13 at 13:04

Section 14.20.3 of the Java Language Specification states it will only work with local variables.

Why is this? My guess is checking for definite assignment and escapage (the local variable doesn't escape into the scope of another method). A field may be initialized anywhere in the class. My guess is that by validating it's a local variable, it's much simpler to analyse.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the reference! –  ConcurrentHashMap Jun 21 '13 at 13:17

First off, I think it would be bad practice to have a variable/resource which is used at multiple places. If it is not opened in the try, then you cannot close it afterwards, if it is opened there, then you won't need a non-local variable. This leads to "second": If you have a resource open already, then you need to close it somewhere else explicitly, otherwise the autoclose wouldn't know if it is open or not.

So, IMHO it makes only sense to handle it the way it is specified in the specification.

share|improve this answer

It may have to do with consistency with the language specifications. Whenever a variable is declared between two brackets, it is encapsulated inside and cannot be accessed from the outside:

anything
{
int var;
}

// cannot access var from here!

Why shoul try { } be an exception ?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.