Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working in Java. I have an unordered list of 5 numbers ranging from 0-100 with no repeats. I'd like to detect if 3 of the numbers are sequential with no gap.

Examples:

[9,12,13,11,10] true
[17,1,2,3,5] true
[19,22,23,27,55] false

As for what I've tried, nothing yet. If I were to write it now, I would probably go with the most naive approach of ordering the numbers, then iteratively checking if a sequence exists.

share|improve this question
4  
I don't get it - how is the first sequence true? –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 21 '13 at 12:54
2  
I think the question is, are there 3 numbers which could be arranged to be sequential with no gap. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 12:54
    
@Pace: Ah yes, that must be it. –  Tim Pietzcker Jun 21 '13 at 12:55
3  
doesnt look like apache.commons :D suggestion: just implement your algorithm as you mentioned. sort and go through, setting a flag if 3 inkrmentals are detected –  user2504380 Jun 21 '13 at 12:59
1  
Three or more. This is what makes the first sequence true. –  roundar Jun 21 '13 at 13:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Allocate an array of size 100:

private static final int MAX_VALUE = 100;

public boolean hasSequence(int [] values) {
  int [] bigArray = new int[MAX_VALUE];

  for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
    bigArray[values[i]] = 1;
  }

  for(int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
    index = values[i];
    if(index == 0 || index == MAX_VALUE-1) {
      continue;
    }
    if(bigArray[index-1] == 1 && bigArray[index+1] == 1) {
      return true;
    }
  }

  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, it's readable pseudocode that happens to look like another language I can think of. It's also the only approach so far that is O(# of items in the list) and would work even if there were duplicates. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 13:46
    
I went ahead and replaced it with a Java form and did away with the small array. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 13:53
    
This solution will throw an index out of bounds exception in the second loop. Also, shouldn't the second loop loop through the ints IN values, not the ints between 0 and its size? –  roundar Jun 22 '13 at 9:42
    
I believe that line 7 should read if(bigArray[values[i]-1] == 1 && bigArray[values[i]+1] == 1) but before that, one should check to make sure values[i] != 0. If this answer is edited to fix this problem, it will be the accepted answer as I believe it is the fastest while also being very clear. –  roundar Jun 22 '13 at 9:51
    
@roundar Thanks, cleaned that up. There is no real need to check that values[index] != 0 though. –  Pace Jun 23 '13 at 16:28

Very naive (but faster) algorithm : (your array is input[], assuming it only contains 0-100 numbers as you said)

int[] nums=new int[101];
for(i=0;i<N;i++) 
   {
   int a=input[i];
   nums[a]++;
   if (a>0) { nums[a-1]++; }
   if (a<100) { nums[a+1]++; }
   }

Then look if there is an element of nums[]==3.

Could be faster with some HashMap instead of the array (and removes the 0-100 limitation)


Edit : Alas, this does NOT work if two numbers could be equal in the initial sequence

share|improve this answer
    
Requires you to loop through an array of 100 size. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 13:44
    
If anyone is wondering why this isn't the selected answer, I tested and chose the fastest answer. I appreciate the answer though. –  roundar Aug 22 '13 at 18:43

This code seems to be implementing your requirements:

public class OrderdedList {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println(orderedWithNoGap(Arrays.asList(9, 12, 13, 11, 10))); // true
        System.out.println(orderedWithNoGap(Arrays.asList(17,1,2,3,5))); // true
        System.out.println(orderedWithNoGap(Arrays.asList(19,22,23,27,55))); // false
    }

    private static boolean orderedWithNoGap(List<Integer> list) {       
        Collections.sort(list);
        Integer prev = null;
        int seq = 0;
        for(Integer i : list) {
            if(prev != null && prev+1 == i)
                seq = seq == 0 ? 2 : seq+1;
            prev = i;
        }
        return seq >= 3;
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Did you run this? Arrays.asList() returns an immutable List –  Lukas Eder Jun 21 '13 at 13:08
1  
@LukasEder Yes, I did. public static <T> List<T> asList(T... a) { return new ArrayList<T>(a); } –  Adam Siemion Jun 21 '13 at 13:10
1  
@LukasEder It returns a fixed-sized List which is not java.util.ArrayList. You can't add() to it and you can't remove() from it, but you can call set(), so in-place mutations are ok. –  Slanec Jun 21 '13 at 13:12
1  
That's not a java.util.ArrayList, it's a java.util.Arrays.ArrayList. But I was wrong, it isn't immutable. It's just a fixed-size list. Wow, learned something today! (after all these years...) –  Lukas Eder Jun 21 '13 at 13:12
    
Requires a sort which the OP seemed to imply he did not want. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 13:46
int sequenceMin(int[] set) {
    int[] arr = Arrays.copy(set);
    Arrays.sort(arr);
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length - 3 + 1; ++i) {
        if (arr[i] == arr[i + 2] - 2) {
            return arr[i];
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

This sorts the array and looks for the desired sequence using the if-statement above, returning the first value.


Without sorting:

(@Pace mentioned the wish for non-sorting.) A limited range can use an efficient "boolean array", BitSet. The iteration with nextSetBit is fast.

    int[] arr = {9,12,13,11,10};
    BitSet numbers = new BitSet(101);
    for (int no : arr) {
        numbers.set(no);
    }
    int sequenceCount = 0;
    int last = -10;
    for (int i = numbers.nextSetBit(0); i >= 0; i = numbers.nextSetBit(i+1)) {
        if (sequenceCount == 0 || i - last > 1) {
            sequenceCount = 1;
        } else {
            sequenceCount++;
            if (sequenceCount >= 3) {
                System.out.println("Sequence start: " + (last - 1));
                break;
            }
        }
        last = i;
    }
    System.out.println("Done");
share|improve this answer
    
The OP already said he had a solution using a sort but was looking for a solution not using a sort. –  Pace Jun 21 '13 at 13:51

General Algorithm steps.

Step 1. Sort the array.
Step 2. There are only 3 possible groups of 3 (next to each other) in an array of length five.
indexes 0,1,2 - 1,2,3 - 2,3,4.
Step 3. Check these 3 combinations to see if the next index is 1 more than the current index.
share|improve this answer

As OP pointed out in comment, he want to check if list contains 3 or more sequential numbers

public class WarRoom {

    static final int seqCount = 3;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>((Arrays.asList(9, 11, 123, 511, 10)));
        for (int i : list) {
            if (seqNumbers(list, i, 0) >= seqCount) {
                System.out.println("Lucky Numbers : " + (i++) + "," + (i++) + "," + i);
            }
        }
    }

    public static int seqNumbers(List<Integer> list, int number, int count) {
        if (list.contains(number)) {
            return seqNumbers(list, number + 1, count + 1);
        }
        else {
            return count;
        }
    }
}

Its not one of the most efficient solution but I love recursion!

share|improve this answer

Haven't test this, but for small memory footprint you could use a BitSet

private static boolean consecutive(int[] input) {
    BitSet bitSet = new BitSet(100);
    for (int num : input) {
        bitSet.set(num);
    }

    bitSet.and(bitSet.get(1, bitSet.length())); // AND shift left by 1 bit
    bitSet.and(bitSet.get(1, bitSet.length())); // AND shift left by 1 bit

    return !bitSet.isEmpty();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This answer uses BitSet with bit shift to find consecutive bits in a set –  Kelvin Ng Jun 21 '13 at 15:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.