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I dont understand what's happening here. I have a button wired up to the below action in AppDelegate:

- (IBAction)openWindow:(id)sender {
    self.winCon = [[NSWindowController alloc] initWithWindowNibName:@"NewWindow"];
}

On click of the button nothing happens (as expected), but when I change the code to(add NSLog())

- (IBAction)openWindow:(id)sender {
    self.winCon = [[NSWindowController alloc] initWithWindowNibName:@"NewWindow"];
    NSLog(@"%@",self.winCon.window);
}

A the window of 'NewWindow' pops up. Why does this happen? Also the NSLog prints (null) in the console.

(In the 'NewWindow' xib the file's owner is NSObject and I haven't wired up the window reference. So I was expecting the log to print null , but the window being displayed was a surprise)

Another thing, when I use:

- (IBAction)openWindow:(id)sender {
    [NSBundle loadNibNamed:@"NewWindow" owner:self.winCon];
}

on click of the button, the window gets displayed. Why does this happen? Isn't loading nib and displaying window separated processes. Shouldn't I be calling the showWindow: or makeKeyAndOrderFront: to display the window?

When I read a particular piece of apple docs in window programming guide:

Opening a window—that is, making a window visible—is normally accomplished by placing the window into the application's window list by invoking one of the methods makeKeyAndOrderFront:, orderFront:, etc., in NSWindow, and so on. Also, with certain bits set in Interface Builder, the window is shown when the nib file is loaded in some cases.

I guess this is the reason for loadNibNamed:.. to open the window. But what are these 'bits set in Interface Builder'. Where can I get information on this? (Also I could prevent the window from opening in the above case when I uncheck 'visible at launch' property of the window - It would help if some more explanation of what this property does.) Thanks.

Note: I am aware of how to initialize the nib using a NSWindowController subclass and do the proper wiring up in the xib, but I'm just curious about the above behavior.

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1 Answer

To answer your first question, when you write NSLog(@"%@",self.winCon.window); you are actually sending a message to the window controller instance winCon to display its window, and then sending it an additional description message to output a string that will be displayed in the console. Written in the normal message passing syntax (not dot notation) and using a "%s" in the format string, you are doing this: NSLog(@"%s",[[[self winCon] window] description]. As per the documentation, the window method will return the window instance and attempt to load the window if it has not been displayed already.

The loadNibNamed:owner: NSBundle method should only be used when you aren't using a window controller. Loading a nib file and displaying the window are two separate actions. If you haven't done so already, you should read up on the File Owner placeholder and how xib files are archived into nib files. That being said, your showWindow method should look like the following (although you really should subclass the NSWindowController and already have it initialized - let me know if that doesn't make sense):

- (IBAction)openWindow:(id)sender {
    self.winCon = [[NSWindowController alloc] initWithWindowNibName:@"NewWindow"];
    [self.winCon showWindow];
}
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Thanks for the info on window method, but loading the window and displaying the windows is different right? Also why does the log state ment return null. And regarding loadNibNamed:owner: the fact that loading nib and displaying window are separate actions is the cause of my doubt. Why should a call to loadNibNamed:owner: display the window. I'll add more details to the question to make it more clear. –  Rakesh Jun 22 '13 at 23:18
    
you meant showWindow: i guess. –  Rakesh Jun 22 '13 at 23:18
    
In the docs its all loading the window, but says nothing about displaying the window. –  Rakesh Jun 22 '13 at 23:29
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