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I wrote an OutputIterator for an answer to another question. Here it is:

#include <queue>

using namespace std;

template< typename T, typename U >
class queue_inserter {
    queue<T, U> &qu;  
public:
    queue_inserter(queue<T,U> &q) : qu(q) { }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator ++ (int) { return *this; }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator * () { return *this; }
    void operator = (const T &val) { qu.push(val); }
};

template< typename T, typename U >
queue_inserter<T,U> make_queue_inserter(queue<T,U> &q) {
    return queue_inserter<T,U>(q);
}

This works great for this little copy function:

template<typename II, typename OI>
void mycopy(II b, II e, OI oi) {
    while (b != e) { *oi++ = *b++; }
}

But it doesn't work at all for the STL copy from algorithms. Here are the wonderful C++ errors I get:

i.cpp:33: error: specialization of ‘template<class _Iterator> struct std::iterator_traits’ in different namespace
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:127: error:   from definition of ‘template<class _Iterator> struct std::iterator_traits’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h: In function ‘_OI std::__copy_aux(_II, _II, _OI) [with _II = int*, _OI = queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > >]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:335:   instantiated from ‘static _OI std::__copy_normal<true, false>::copy_n(_II, _II, _OI) [with _II = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<int*, std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> > >, _OI = queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > >]’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:387:   instantiated from ‘_OutputIterator std::copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _OutputIterator) [with _InputIterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<int*, std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> > >, _OutputIterator = queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > >]’
i.cpp:53:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:310: error: no type named ‘value_type’ in ‘struct std::iterator_traits<queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > > >’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:315: error: no type named ‘value_type’ in ‘struct std::iterator_traits<queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > > >’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:315: error: ‘__value’ is not a member of ‘<declaration error>’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:335:   instantiated from ‘static _OI std::__copy_normal<true, false>::copy_n(_II, _II, _OI) [with _II = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<int*, std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> > >, _OI = queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > >]’
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:387:   instantiated from ‘_OutputIterator std::copy(_InputIterator, _InputIterator, _OutputIterator) [with _InputIterator = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<int*, std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> > >, _OutputIterator = queue_inserter<int, std::deque<int, std::allocator<int> > >]’
i.cpp:53:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:317: error: ‘__simple’ is not a valid template argument for type ‘bool’ because it is a non-constant expression
/usr/include/c++/4.0.0/bits/stl_algobase.h:317: error: ‘copy’ is not a member of ‘<declaration error>’

Here is the driver:

int main() {
    vector<int> v;
    v.push_back( 1 );
    v.push_back( 2 );
    queue<int> q;
    copy( v.begin(), v.end(), make_queue_inserter(q) );
    while (q.size() > 0) {
        cout << q.front() << endl;
        q.pop();
    }
}

Why in the world is it specializing iterator_traits. What's wrong with my iterator? Can't I just write my own simple iterators?

share|improve this question
    
And how should the algorithm know what kind of iterator it is? Eg, the algorithm may run faster with Random Access Iterators, but how does it know if your iterator is random access or not? –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 20:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Your queue_inserter needs to be derived from std::iterator so that all the typedefs such as value_type are properly defined since these are used inside STL algorithms This definition works:

template< typename T, typename U >
class queue_inserter : public std::iterator<std::output_iterator_tag, T>{
    queue<T, U> &qu;  
public:
    queue_inserter(queue<T,U> &q) : qu(q) { }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator ++ (int) { return *this; }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator ++ () { return *this; }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator * () { return *this; }
    void operator = (const T &val) { qu.push(val); }
};
share|improve this answer
    
It's amazing how poorly the STL was designed. I thought the whole point of iterators was that I could roll my own? Does char* inherit from std::iterator? But thanks for the info. :-) –  Frank Krueger Nov 12 '09 at 17:45
4  
You can still get around by not deriving..(I haven't tried it though), but you need to all those typedefs yourself. –  Naveen Nov 12 '09 at 17:48
2  
@Frank Krueger: How would you design the algorithms of the standard library to work efficiently if they can't determine the properties of the types that they need to operate on? It's not a trivial problem. std::iterator_traits is specialized by the implementation for pointer types so that these can be used with algorithms without any further work on the part of the user. –  Charles Bailey Nov 12 '09 at 18:07
1  
@Frank: Thats a poorly though out comment. The way iterators are designed is a very common technique used in C++ to pass type information around when using templates. Just do a quicj search for traits and I am sure you find appropriate articles on it. Note: The algorithms use traits. For the pointer types (like char*) they are explicitly defined for class objects they point back at the type for the required information. All very basic stuff. –  Loki Astari Nov 12 '09 at 19:42
1  
But are typedefs inherited that way? I am getting confused between this answer and another answer at SO (link). –  Hindol Oct 1 '12 at 13:32

Derive it from std::iterator. If you are interested the Dr. Dobb's has an article about custom containers and iterators.

share|improve this answer

Your iterator doesn't meet the requirement for an 'assignable' type which is a requirement for an output iterator because it contains a reference and assignable types need to ensure that after t = u that t is equivalent to u.

You can provide a suitable specialization for iterator_traits for your iterator either by deriving from a specialization of std::iterator or by providing one explicitly.

namespace std
{
    template<> struct iterator_traits<MyIterator>
    {
        typedef std::output_iterator_tag iterator_category;
        typedef void value_type;
        typedef void difference_type;
    };
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for giving me the curiosity to know more about iterator_traits! Never knew it before. Although an explicit specialization of iterator_traits isn't needed. See my answer :) –  legends2k Sep 22 '11 at 20:16
    
iterator_traits, char_traits, pointer_traits;, regex_traits, and allocator_traits too! There's also an <type_traits> include, but that's completely unrelated. –  Mooing Duck Sep 22 '11 at 20:28
#include <queue>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template< typename T, typename U >
class queue_inserter
{
    queue<T, U> &qu;

public:
    // for iterator_traits to refer
    typedef output_iterator_tag iterator_category;
    typedef T value_type;
    typedef ptrdiff_t difference_type;
    typedef T* pointer;
    typedef T& reference;

    queue_inserter(queue<T,U> &q) : qu(q) { }
    queue_inserter<T,U>& operator ++ () { return *this; }
    queue_inserter<T,U> operator * () { return *this; }
    void operator = (const T &val) { qu.push(val); }
};

template< typename T, typename U >
queue_inserter<T,U> make_queue_inserter(queue<T,U> &q)
{
    return queue_inserter<T,U>(q);
}

int main()
{
    // uses initalizer list (C++0x), pass -std=c++0x to g++
    vector<int> v({1, 2, 3});
    queue<int, deque<int>> q;
    copy(v.cbegin(), v.cend(), make_queue_inserter(q));
    while (!q.empty())
    {
        cout << q.front() << endl;
        q.pop();
    }
}

This should do it with iterator_traits; a helper struct in <iterator> which defines all types an iterator should typically define. Functions in <algorithm>, refer to these types when required like iterator_traits<it>::iterator_category or say iterator_traits<it>::value_type, etc. Just defining them inside one's custom iterator would do the trick. This is the modern way of writing iterators, as opposed to the classical way of inheriting from std::iterator. Having a look at <iterator> reveals that even std::iterator defines these types i.e. iterator_category, difference_type, etc. This is the reason, when inherited from std::iterator, the derived iterator class gets these due to hereditary.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is inheriting from std::iterator obsolete and where I can find more about how to do it the right way then? –  SasQ Dec 13 '12 at 3:03

There is a reason Boost.Iterators exists.

You should particularly check out the iterator_adaptor class, a really convenient way of writing an iterator class very quickly.

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