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In this topic: How find path at the m x n table I found out how generate paths between two points, and this is code:

go m n (i,j) = 
   [ (i+1,j) | i<m ] ++
   [ (i-1,j) | i>1 ] ++
   [ (i,j+1) | j<n ] ++
   [ (i,j-1) | j>1 ] 

-- isEndOfPath p q = (p == q)

genPath p q acc m n input buf = g p q acc buf where
  g p q acc buf | p==q = [(acc)]   -- return acc, buf
  g p q acc buf = [s
                     | r <- go m n q, notElem r buf, notElem r acc, 
                       notElem r input,
                       s <- genPath p r (r:acc) m n input (r:buf)] ++
                  [s
                     | r <- go m n q, notElem r acc, 
                       r==p,
                       s <- genPath p r (r:acc) m n input (r:buf)]

For example, we can search path from (2,2) to (1,1) on board 2x2. Thus, we can call it as

genPath (2,2) (1,1) [(1,1)] 2 2 [(3,3),(1,1)] [(1,1)] 

and we have result

[[(2,2),(2,1),(1,1)],[(2,2),(2,1),(1,1)],[(2,2),(1,2),(1,1)],[(2,2),(1,2),(1,1)]]

So we have correct paths.

And now i will find all paths between pairs of points. In Prolog it was very easy and I haven't any problem with this. So, mayby I show you my algorithm and code:

First predicat - when we find all paths, we return it:

genAllPaths([],A,A,_,_,_,_).

Else, we must generate paths recursively. So, firs we find path between first pairs, and then we can search other paths:

genAllPaths([(I1,J1),(I2,J2)|T],Acc,S,M,N,Input,Bufor) :-
    genPath((I1,J1),(I2,J2),[(I2,J2)],X,M,N,Input,[(I2,J2)|Bufor],NewBufor),
    genAllPaths(T,[X|Acc],S,M,N,Input,NewBufor).

If you don't understand something, please ask me.

Hence, now I'll do it in haskell. I tried, but again, I have a lot of problems with it. If you know how do it and would like help me - I will very grateful.

share|improve this question
    
StackOverflow doesn't work as well for this style of question. I suggest you try to go somewhere more interactive with it like the #haskell IRC channel (on freenode). I think you'll get better help there. – Tikhon Jelvis Jun 21 '13 at 16:51
1  
I agree with Tikhon Jelvis. "Hence, now I'll do it in haskell. I tried, but again, I have a lot of problems with it. If you know how do it and would like help me - I will very grateful." <- This is probably too general of a question. It would be better to ask about a specific/narrow barrier/problem you are trying to over come. – Davorak Jun 21 '13 at 17:01
    
you have 8 arguments in the call to genPath/9. S is passed around unchanged. Please recheck your Prolog code. – Will Ness Jun 21 '13 at 20:33
    
Ok, you're right. I think that now is ok. – Jacob Jun 21 '13 at 21:28
    
someone with the credentials of the OP has vandalized this question. I restored it to the last valid state. – Will Ness Jun 22 '13 at 22:59
go m n (i,j) = 
   [ (i+1,j) | i<m ] ++
   [ (i-1,j) | i>1 ] ++
   [ (i,j+1) | j<n ] ++
   [ (i,j-1) | j>1 ] 

genPath p q acc m n input buf = g p q acc buf  -- return all solutions
  where
    g p q acc buf | p==q = [(acc,buf)]   -- return acc, buf
    g p q acc buf = [s |
                       r <- go m n q, notElem r buf, notElem r acc, 
                       notElem r input,
                       s <- g p r (r:acc) (r:buf)] ++
                    [s |
                       r <- go m n q, notElem r acc, 
                       r==p,
                       s <- g p r (r:acc) (r:buf)]

your new code:

genAllPaths([],A,A,_,_,_,_).

genAllPaths([(I1,J1),(I2,J2)|T],Acc,S,M,N,Input,Bufor) :-
  genPath((I1,J1),(I2,J2),[(I2,J2)],X,M,N,Input,[(I2,J2)|Bufor],NewBufor),
  genAllPaths(T,[X|Acc],S,M,N,Input,NewBufor).

The direct textual translation into Haskell is:

genAllPaths points acc m n input buf = g points acc buf where
  g  []     acc  _  = [acc]
  g (p:q:t) acc buf = 
    let sols = genPath p q [q] m n input (q:buf) -- => [(x,newbuf)]
    in concat [g t (x:acc) newbuf | (x,newbuf) <- sols]

Another way to write it is

genAllPaths points acc m n input buf = g points acc buf where
  g  []     acc  _  = [acc]
  g (p:q:t) acc buf = 
    genPath p q [q] m n input (q:buf) >>= (\ (x,newbuf) ->
    g t (x:acc) newbuf )

This uses the bind operator >>= from the list monad. There's also the do notation,

genAllPaths points acc m n input buf = g points acc buf where
  g  []     acc  _  = return acc    -- same as writing `[acc]`, for list monad
  g (p:q:t) acc buf = 
    do
      (x,newbuf) <- genPath p q [q] m n input (q:buf) 
      g t (x:acc) newbuf 

which expresses the same computation without the explicit use of bind. List monad expresses non-deterministic computations by representing all possible choices as a list. True representation would use unordered lists with unpredictable order; normal Haskell lists induce order, but Prolog does the same with its left-to-right top-to-bottom strategy.

Since Haskell is lazy, producing the resulting solutions one by one is equivalent to the backtracking search of Prolog, and take 1 can be used to emulate cut.

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