Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my JavaScript application, I have several kinds of objects, including Query, Document and Posting . A Document contains a bunch of metadata about a document (title, abstract, etc.); a Posting represents some Document retrieved by some Query at some rank. The same Document may be retrieved by more than one Query, and thus may have more than one Posting associated with it.

The application has two relevant views: one that displays all Postings for a given Query, and one that displays all Documents. Since the user can interact with the two views in much the same way, I decided to use prototype inheritance by making a Document instance the prototype of one or more Posting instances. That way, the Posting inherits all of the metadata from the Document, and just adds its own Query reference and rank value. Works like a charm.

In addition to data (Query, rank) a posting carries some behavior as well. I wanted to factor out this behavior so that I don't have thousands of identical methods being created. In the case of Document, I simply moved all my functions to Document.prototype. But in the case of Postings, I cannot do that, because each Posting has a different prototype (its respective Document). While I could put some of the methods used by Posting into Document.prototype and get at them that way, some of the methods are polymorphic and need to be implemented differently for Document and Posting.

My question is this: if I am using prototype inheritance in Posting to carry data, can I somehow also factor out behavior so that I reuse the same method function instances for all my Posting instances instead of creating a new batch of methods every time I create a new Posting?

function Document(id, title) {
    this.id = id;
    this.title = title;
}

// Here prototype is used to factor out behavior
Document.prototype.document = function() { return this; }
Document.prototype.toString = function() { return 'Document [' + this.id + ']: "' + this.title + '"'; }


function Posting(query, rank) {
    this.query = query;
    this.rank = rank;

    // Can I move these two definitions out of the Posting instance to avoid
    // creating multiple copies of these functions as I construct 1000s of Postings?
    this.document = function() { return Object.getPrototypeOf(this); }
    this.toString = function() { return this.document().toString() + ' at rank ' + this.rank; }
}

function createPosting(query, document, rank) {
    // here prototype is used to share data
    Posting.prototype = document;
    var posting = new Posting(query, rank);
    return posting;
}

UPDATE

I made a mistake in the code example above: the correct way to do inheritance (as pointed out in comments below) is to set the prototype first: Posting.prototype = document; I think the rest of my question is still valid :-)

share|improve this question
2  
posting.prototype = Document; What's the point of this? posting is an object, the prototype property does not have any specific meaning. You are not setting up inheritance this way. Only the prototype property of functions is special. Generally I have to say that making a Posting instance inherit from a specific Document instance does not sound like a proper use of inheritance. Maybe you are more looking for composition? I.e. a Posting has a Document, instead of a Posting is a Document. –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '13 at 17:21
    
If this is in a browser, I would choose a different name since Document already has meaning. –  Crazy Train Jun 21 '13 at 17:24
    
@CrazyTrain Do you mean document (lowercase D) or do you just mean in general? Like that the idea of a "document" has a meaning in browsers? I wasn't sure if there was some magical Document object I didn't know about :) –  Ian Jun 21 '13 at 17:28
1  
@Ian: The Document is a constructor function in browsers. document instanceof Document; // true –  Crazy Train Jun 21 '13 at 17:47
1  
@Gene: Yes, I get that, but as I said, only functions have a special prototype property. If you assign a prototype property to an object, it's just an arbitrary property that has the name "prototype". No inheritance is established. –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '13 at 17:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Why don't you save the functions outside the constructor of Posting.

function Document(id, title) {
    this.id = id;
    this.title = title;
}

// Here prototype is used to factor out behavior
Document.prototype.document = function() { return this; }
Document.prototype.toString = function() { return 'Document [' + this.id + ']: "' + this.title + '"'; }

function PostingToString()
{
  return this.document().toString() + ' at rank ' + this.rank;
}
function PostingDocument ()
{
    return Object.getPrototypeOf(this);
}
function Posting(query, rank) {
    this.query = query;
    this.rank = rank;

    this.document = PostingDocument; 
    this.toString = PostingToString;
}


function createPosting(query, document, rank) {
    var posting = new Posting(query, rank);
    // here prototype is used to share data
    posting.prototype = document;
    return posting;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I was thinking about this compromise. One question: will PostingDocument and PostingToString functions be bound to the right object (so that this refers to the specific instance)? –  Gene Golovchinsky Jun 21 '13 at 18:23
    
yes. this will refer to the right object. –  Parthik Gosar Jun 21 '13 at 18:27
    
There is a limitation with this approach: to guarantee that PostingDocument and PostingToString are called with the right this value, bind() needs to be called on them. But bind() makes a copy of the function on which it's called, defeating the savings from having to specify the code once. This problem occurs when these functions are called by knockoutjs events. –  Gene Golovchinsky Jun 21 '13 at 20:58

It is hard to test memory usage of Javascript in browsers... As pointed out in a comment by Gene .bind() makes a copy of the function, so the solution of Parthik Gosar doesn't save any memory. Furthermore it still has references to functions that are not really handled as references in most browsers. So even without the bind() function this will consume a lot of memory.

This approach should save a lot of memory...

var staticFcts = {
    'document': {
        'document': function() { return this; },
        'posting': function() { return Object.getPrototypeOf(this); }
    },
    'toString': {
        'document': function() { return 'Document [' + this.id + ']: "' + this.title + '"'; },
        'posting': function() { return this.document().toString() + ' at rank ' + this.rank; }
    }   
};

var myOwnProxy = function(method) {  
    var c = staticFcts[method][this.typeOf].bind(this);
    return c();
}



function Document(id, title) {
    this.id = id;
    this.title = title;
}

Document.prototype.document = function() { var p = myOwnProxy.bind(this,'document');     return p.call(); };
Document.prototype.toString = function() { var p =     myOwnProxy.bind(this,'toString');return p.call(); }; 
Document.prototype.typeOf = 'document'; // default type is 'document', this is necessary
// because there is no way in Javascript to determine the class name.
// Unfortunantely "Proxy" (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Proxy)  is not widely supported either.

function Posting(query, rank) {
    this.query = query;
    this.rank = rank;
}

function createPosting(query, document, rank) {
    Posting.prototype = document;
    var posting = new Posting(query, rank);
    posting.typeOf = 'posting'; //overwrite type

    return posting;
}


var docs = [];
var postings= [];

var now = new Date().getTime();

// memory and performance test
for($i=0;$i<100000;$i++) {
 var d = new Document(1,'document1');
 var p = createPosting('query1', d, 1);
    docs.push(d);
    postings.push(p);
}
console.log('needed time', ((new Date().getTime())-now)/1000 + ' sec');

function roughSizeOfObject( object ) {

    var objectList = [];
    var stack = [ object ];
    var bytes = 0;

    while ( stack.length ) {
        var value = stack.pop();

        if ( typeof value === 'boolean' ) {
            bytes += 4;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'string' ) {
            bytes += value.length * 2;
        }
        else if ( typeof value === 'number' ) {
            bytes += 8;
        }
        else if
        (
                typeof value === 'object'
            && objectList.indexOf( value ) === -1
        )
        {
            objectList.push( value );

            for( i in value ) {
                stack.push( value[ i ] );
        }
        }
    }
    return bytes;
}   

console.log('memory usage: ', roughSizeOfObject(docs) + roughSizeOfObject(postings));

Simon

share|improve this answer
    
How does roughSizeOfObject() account for member functions? –  Gene Golovchinsky Jun 21 '13 at 22:21
    
It's just a guess of the real size.. in javascript everything is an object, member functions are treated as objects too. But as mentioned before, it's not really possible to measure the right memory usage. What you could do, is to use the toString method to get the javascript code of the method and add this as memory size. e.g.: arguments.callee.toString().length or through the .prototype.toString()..but the toString method is overwritten in this case, so this will not work as expected! –  Simon Tretter Jun 22 '13 at 0:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.