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I want some clarification when it comes to accessing objects as well as the adding of properties, I'm totally new to Javascript.

I have an object like so:

var device = { 
               dev1 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "AIR" },
               dev2 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "BEE" }
             }

Is there a reason why it botches up when I do these two lines? (I'm not using a browser but running purely on Javascript as an application.)

console.log( device.dev1['version'] ) returns undefined
console.log( device['dev1'].version ) returns undefined

Now for adding properties... I want to use String type property key names. Meaning I don't want it to look like this. It has to follow the object I described above by using the " "s.

     dev1 : { version : "1.0", name: "AIR" } 

Is there a way to define property name as strings? Can it be done like this?

var newKey = "health";
device['dev1'].newKey = newValue;

Thanks alot!

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1  
In your last example, you want device['dev1'][newKey], which evaluates to device['dev1']['health']. –  apsillers Jun 21 '13 at 18:34
1  
You're missing a comma after dev1 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "AIR" }. If you add the comma both console.log statements work as you'd expect. –  Steven Wexler Jun 21 '13 at 18:36
1  
As steaks said about the ,. Also, console.log always returns undefined, but it logs stuff to the console, too. –  Paul S. Jun 21 '13 at 18:37
    
I don't know if anyone has told you yet, but you're missing a comma after the first object declaration on line two. –  Seiyria Jun 21 '13 at 18:43
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Once I fix your syntax error, your code works fine:

var device = { 
  dev1 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "AIR" }, // added comma here
  dev2 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "BEE" }
};
console.log( device.dev1['version'] ); // 1.0
console.log( device['dev1'].version ); // 1.0
console.log( device.dev1.version );    // 1.0

And property names are always strings. They cannot be anything else. If it looks like the property name is not a string, it's simply shorthand for a string.

You can use the bracket syntax when the property name is a string in a variable, for both getting and setting:

var newKey = 'someName';
var newValue = 'woot';

device.dev1[newKey] = newValue;
console.log(device.dev1[newKey]);  // woot
console.log(device.dev1.someName); // woot

So if you know the property name ahead of time, then the shorthand dot property syntax obj.propName is identical to obj['propName']. But if you don't know the property name ahead of time, then you must use the bracket syntax. obj[propNameString]

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Thank you so much :) this was super helpful. –  Cheruby Jun 21 '13 at 18:41
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You're missing a comma after your dev1 object:

var device = { 
    dev1 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "AIR" },
    dev2 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "BEE" }
}

For your question about adding keys, you would want to use dot-notation when possible, and array-notation for variable key names:

var newKey = "health";
device.dev1[newKey] = newValue;
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You missed the comma (,)

var device = { 
    dev1 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "AIR" }, // <----
    dev2 : { "version" : "1.0", "name" : "BEE" }
};

var newKey = "health", newValue = 'newValue';
device.dev1.newKey = newValue; 
device['dev1']['newKey'] = newValue;

Working Example.

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