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I have a method that outputs an integer:

public int Random6()
{
    int n = _r.Next (1, 7);
    return n;
}

And I have a loop that calls the method:

public static void DiceLoop()
{
    int result = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < maxDice; i++)
    {
        result += Random6;
    }
    Console.WriteLine (result);
}

I want to be able to write the loop once and then pass it multiple methods using a variable name. For example:

public static void DiceLoop()
{
    int result = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < maxDice; i++)
    {
        result += diceType;
    }
    Console.WriteLine (result);
}

Where diceType is a variable that will hold method names using an if function. I know I can't just have a have a method as a variable. I tried making diceType a string and passing that to the loop, but because Random6 gives out an int it won't work. I tried casting diceType into an int, but that doesn't work because it's casting the name of the method, not the number it spits out. How should I go about doing this? Do I just need an extra layer of variables and casting somewhere?

share|improve this question
    
You could make a Dice class/interface which has a method to retrieve a random value (preferred), or pass in a method delegate. – Chris Sinclair Jun 21 '13 at 21:36
2  
How could DiceLoop work? Do you mean result += Random6()? – Dour High Arch Jun 21 '13 at 21:37
    
why not just int RollDice(int numDice, int numSides) {return Enumerable.Range(0,numDice).Sum(r.Next(1,numSides+1));}? – Joel Coehoorn Jun 21 '13 at 21:58
    
@JoelCoehoorn While that's efficient, I don't think it gets at the crux of the question. He may also be doing something more interesting in RollDice than rolling X-sided die Y times. At a pretty early point in increasing complexity, the delegate approach is preferable, as it gives you lots of flexibility. In your approach, you're rolling the most common case (an X-sided die Y times). However, I've played games where a required roll was 3d4+1d20. In that case, having the delegate makes any possible roll expressible as an IEnumerable<Tuple<int,int>>. – Michael Blackburn Jun 21 '13 at 22:18
    
@Dour High Arch yeah thats what I meant. I left the brackets off of it. I had to modify it back in after an unsuccesful attempt at something else. – AmazingMrBrock Jun 22 '13 at 1:24
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can have a delegate as a variable. You can pass a Func<int> parameter into your DiceLoop function:

public static void DiceLoop(Func<int> getNext) 
{
    int result = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < maxDice; i++)
    {
        result += getNext();
    }
    Console.WriteLine (result);
}

And then you can call this like:

DiceLoop(Random6);

This is just the easiest way to solve your particular case. If you wanted to say, create a variable and assign it reference to a delegate, you can do this:

Func<int> getNext = Random6;
DiceLoop(getNext);

You can even use lambda expressions (a.k.a anonymous functions) this way:

Func<int> getNext = () => _r.Next(1, 7);
DiceLoop(getNext);
share|improve this answer
    
that looks really clean, and I imagine it works quite well but I am too noob to actually implement it into my code. Thanks for providing the correct answer though. I'll research all the things in there and hopefully figure out how to make it work. – AmazingMrBrock Jun 22 '13 at 1:23
    
I did however find a work around that doesn't require me to change the Random6 method to another method. Instead I just change variables in other methods. Much simpler and noob friendly. Thanks for the help :) – AmazingMrBrock Jun 22 '13 at 1:46

To extend p.s.w.g's excellent answer, you can extend your dice roller to accept a number of sides as an input:

Func<int,int> getNextX = (x) => _r.Next(1,x+1);

Read "Func<int>" as "Function that returns an int," so "Func<int,int>" is a "Function that takes an int as a parameter and returns an int."

Then, DiceLoop would look like this:

public static void DiceLoop(Func<int,int> roller)
{
    int result = 0, maxDice = 20;
    for(int i = 1; i <= maxDice; i++)
    {
        result += roller(i);
    }
    Console.WriteLine (result);
}

This would give you the sum of one roll each from a 1 sided die (?) to a 20-sided die.

share|improve this answer
1  
Small fix: .Next() for a 6-sided die has to use arguments (1, 7). A d8 needs (1,9), a d10 needs (1,11), d12 is (1,13), d20 is (1,21), etc. He'll likely want to accept the number of sides as the argument and add one for the call. – Joel Coehoorn Jun 21 '13 at 21:56
1  
Also: at this point, why even use a delegate? Just the number of sides as the argument in the first place. But I should be raising that question with the OP. – Joel Coehoorn Jun 21 '13 at 21:57
1  
Why use a a delegate? because it allows you to alter your source of randomness. Currently you're using the built-in pseudo-RNG (_r), but you may want to delegate to a source of real randomness. – Michael Blackburn Nov 22 '13 at 17:32
    
Good point :) . – Joel Coehoorn Nov 22 '13 at 17:38

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