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I hope you are doing very well. I would like to know how to calculate the cumulative sum of a data set with certain conditions. A simplified version of my data set would look like:

t   id  
A   22
A   22
R   22
A   41
A   98
A   98
A   98
R   98
A   46
A   46
R   46
A   46
A   46
A   46
R   46
A   46
A   12
R   54
A   66
R   13 
A   13
A   13
A   13
A   13
R   13
A   13

Would like to make a new data set where, for each value of "id", I would have the cumulative number of times that each id appears , but when t=R I need to restart the counting e.g.

t   id  count
A   22  1
A   22  2
R   22  0
A   41  1
A   98  1
A   98  2
A   98  3
R   98  0
A   46  1
A   46  2
R   46  0
A   46  1
A   46  2
A   46  3
R   46  0
A   46  1
A   12  1
R   54  0
A   66  1
R   13  0
A   13  1
A   13  2
A   13  3
A   13  4
R   13  0
A   13  1

Any ideas as to how to do this? Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Can we assume that your dataframe never has non-adjacent id values, e.g. there are no other "41" values further on? –  Carl Witthoft Jun 23 '13 at 18:08
    
Yes, there are no other values further on, because it is previously ordered by another column (the time sequence of each id and t). I think @Arun solved the problem. –  MSS Jun 24 '13 at 14:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Using rle:

out <- transform(df, count = sequence(rle(do.call(paste, df))$lengths))
out$count[out$t == "R"] <- 0

If your data.frame has more than these two columns, and you want to check only these two columns, then, just replace df with df[, 1:2] (or) df[, c("t", "id")].

If you find do.call(paste, df) dangerous (as @flodel comments), then you can replace that with:

as.character(interaction(df))

I personally don't find anything dangerous or clumsy with this setup (as long as you have the right separator, meaning you know your data well). However, if you do find it as such, the second solution may help you.


Update:

For those who don't like using do.call(paste, df) or as.character(interaction(df)) (please see the comment exchanges between me, @flodel and @HongOoi), here's another base solution:

idx <- which(df$t == "R")
ww <- NULL
if (length(idx) > 0) {
    ww <- c(min(idx), diff(idx), nrow(df)-max(idx))
    df <- transform(df, count = ave(id, rep(seq_along(ww), ww), 
                   FUN=function(y) sequence(rle(y)$lengths)))
    df$count[idx] <- 0
} else {
    df$count <- seq_len(nrow(df))
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I find that do.call(paste0, df) a dangerous approach for finding identical rows. Would welcome something more robust. –  flodel Jun 21 '13 at 23:07
    
Do you mean using paste instead of paste0 (then, yes I understand)? If not, I don't quite get what's dangerous? Could you provide an example of the scenario you're referring to? –  Arun Jun 21 '13 at 23:11
1  
1) (the main concern) imagine if df had more than those two columns of interest 2) not the case with the OP's data, but pasting can theoretically lead to matches that are not, e.g. rle(paste0(c("ab", "a"), c("c", "bc"))). Having to consider that possibility and having to choose a data-dependent separator as to avoid these situations makes the approach a little cumbersome and icky. –  flodel Jun 21 '13 at 23:49
    
@flodel, Point taken, but I disagree (not being rude). The example you show is what I mention in my comment earlier (and changed paste0 to paste). But expecting data like c("a_", "c") and c("a", "_c") is a bit too much IMHO (and if so, yes we've to change the separator). With regexp one does data-dependent stuff all the time (I don't find it new or cumbersome). I guess then interaction function from base shouldn't be used as well from what you say? In any case, I'll write back with an alternative base solution (if I find one) for those who agree with you. –  Arun Jun 22 '13 at 6:34
    
@arun: paste will lose the distinction between a and b, and a and ` b. This problem is present regardless of the separator used, or if no separator is used (paste0). interaction` will not, and in general doesn't depend on assumptions about text content. –  Hong Ooi Jun 22 '13 at 6:49

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