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How come the following code works:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int (*daytab)[13];
    int no_leap_year[13] = {0,31,28,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30};
    daytab = &no_leap_year;

    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}

while the following generates an error and a warning:

#include <stdio.h>

int (*daytab)[13];
int no_leap_year[13] = {0,31,28,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30};
daytab = &no_leap_year;

int main()
{
    system("Pause");
    return 0;
}

The error messages are as follows:

error C2040: 'daytab' : 'int' differs in levels of indirection from 'int (*)[13]'
warning C4047: 'initializing' : 'int' differs in levels of indirection from 'int (*)[13]'

I don't understand why having these declaration outside main() makes any difference. How does making daytab and no_leap_year local or external affect their data types?

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5  
This: daytab = &no_leap_year; is a statement, not a declaration. – Oliver Charlesworth Jun 21 '13 at 23:41
    
The error message is unclear because the compiler, knowing that a statement cannot appear in that context, assumes that daytab = &no_leap_year; is a declaration, with the unspecified type defaulting to int. – Keith Thompson Jun 22 '13 at 0:11
up vote 9 down vote accepted

This statement:

daytab = &no_leap_year;

(and all other statements) aren't allowed outside of a function context. Some minor rearrangement will fix it for you:

int no_leap_year[13] = {0,31,28,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30,31,30};
int (*daytab)[13] = &no_leap_year;
share|improve this answer
    
one thing i don't understand,i wrote the same statement as this : 'daytab=no_leap_year;' and it showed warning, why?, the name of any array represents the address of its first element and the '&' operator does the same,so why this warning. – rohit shrivastava Jun 22 '13 at 3:42
    
Arrays aren't pointers. There are hundreds of questions and answers on stack overflow to read more about the difference, or you can check out the comp.lang.c FAQ. – Carl Norum Jun 22 '13 at 6:33

As noted by Carl Norum you can't write this statement:

daytab = &no_leap_year;

outside of a function just because this is an assignment operation you are performing and assignment operations aren't allowed outside main() or any other function,you will have to define the storage class for every datatype outside the function.

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