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Users can have one or many Objects.

An Object can be shared with any number of Users.

Currently I have:

public class Object
{
    [Required]
    [Key]
    public virtual int ObjectId { get; set; }
    public List<int> SharedWith { get; set; }
}

But this means that in order to find those Objects that have been shared with a particular User, I have to do something like this:

var objects = new List<Object>();
foreach (Object object in _context.Objects)
{
    if (object.SharedWith.Contains(userId){ objects.Add(object) }
}

This seems hardly efficient. What's the right way to model this relationship so the above query can be made more efficient?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
public class Object
{
    public int ObjectID                    { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<User> Users { get; set; }
}

public class User
{
    public int UserID                          { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<Object> Objects { get; set; }
}

With these 2 navigation properties, Entity Framework will handle the many to many relation for you.

Assuming your userID exists in your database, you can query like,

var objects = _context.User
               .Include("Objects") // Eagerly load virtual collection
               .Where(q => q.UserID == userID)
               .First().Objects;
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1  
emre you just need to navigation properties - OnModelCreating configuration is redundant - unless you need specific naming, extra fields, cascade different etc. –  NSGaga Jun 22 '13 at 1:08
    
Ef is smarter than I thought then :) Thanks for the input. –  emre nevayeshirazi Jun 22 '13 at 1:19
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If you’ve had many-to-many relationships when using the database-first strategy, you may be familiar with the fact that Entity Framework can create many-to-many mappings when the database join table contains only the primary keys of the related entities. This mapping rule is the same for Code First, so you can also create many-to-many relationship as follow:

public class Object
{
    [Key]
    public int ObjectID{ get; set; }
    public List<User> Users { get; set; }
}

public class User
{
    [Key]
    public int UserID{ get; set; }
    public List<Object> Objects { get; set; }
}

and then second part of Emre's answer.

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Thank you Elvin. How is this approach better than using the virtual properties in emre's answer? –  SB2055 Jun 22 '13 at 15:47
1  
@SB2055 If you do not mark your navigation properties as virtual, when you request for User object for example, db will return related Objects as well. However, with virtual it will bring Objects when you request them explicitly. This is good for performance reasons since you might not need the related Objects for user or Users for Object all the time. When you need them you can use .Include() to bring them just like it would without virtual keyword. You should read about eager and lazy loading concepts in EF for more info. –  emre nevayeshirazi Jun 23 '13 at 1:21
    
@emrenevayeshirazi - so cool. Thanks dude –  SB2055 Jun 23 '13 at 1:36
    
@emre,:D, thank you. –  Elvin Mammadov Jun 25 '13 at 9:39
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