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I'm receiving a "Syntax error in INSERT INTO statement" when trying to submit this query.

INSERT INTO 
  Modified (ModifiedID, Username, Table, RecordID) 
VALUES 
  ('12','null','Accident','1')

All datatypes match in the database. If I run the query without inserting into "Table", it works. I don't know why, when I add the table string value to the query I receive the error.

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Try this

INSERT INTO Modified (ModifiedID, Username, [Table], RecordID) 
  VALUES ('12','null','Accident','1')

In most SQL dialects, TABLE is a RESERVED WORD. The [] is Microsoft's delimiter and I believe backticks ` are used in MySQL

Also, do you really want 'null' as opposed to NULL, they have different meanings

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1  
+1. All points, and a nice catch on 'null' (a string) vs. NULL (a non-value). – Ken White Jun 22 '13 at 1:46
    
Ah reserved word. Thank you – user2444472 Jun 22 '13 at 1:53
    
Thanks also for the note about "null" and "NULL" – user2444472 Jun 22 '13 at 1:53
1  
@user2444472: So that it's clear, the difference is not about lowercase vs. UPPERCASE. It has to do with the quotes ('null') vs. the lack of quotes (NULL). The first is a character string, the other is an unknown (not set) value. They have totally different meanings. – Ken White Jun 22 '13 at 1:59
    
Upvote for the catch on NULL. All too often I see (string)'null' in db tables when NULL should have been used and this can have severely unintended consequenses – mplf Jun 22 '13 at 3:03

In HSQLDB:

INSERT INTO Modified (ModifiedID, Username, "Table", RecordID)
VALUES (12, NULL, 'Accident', 1);

I am just going to assume that "key-ish" sounding fields, eg. ModifiedID and RecordID, are supposed to be INTEGER or BIGINT rather than, say, VARCHAR. DDL would be nice.

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In MySQL:

INSERT INTO Modified (ModifiedID, Username, `Table`, RecordID) 
VALUES ('12', NULL, 'Accident', '1')
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