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I've got this little ServiceStack message:

[Route("/server/time", "GET")]
public class ServerTime : IReturn<ServerTime>
{
    public DateTimeOffset DateTime { get; set; }
    public TimeZoneInfo TimeZone { get; set; }
}

And its respective service handler is as follow:

public object Get(ServerTime request)
{
    return new ServerTime
    {
        DateTime = DateTimeOffset.Now,
        TimeZone = TimeZoneInfo.Local,
    };
}

The client test code looks like this:

var client = new JsonServiceClient("http://localhost:54146/");
var response = client.Get<ServerTime>(new ServerTime());

But response.TimeZoneInfo is ALWAYS empty...

Also the metadata for the service (JSON) does not show it:

(Sample request in the JSON metadata page)

POST /json/reply/ServerTime HTTP/1.1 
Host: localhost 
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: length

{"DateTime":"\/Date(-62135596800000)\/"}

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: length

{"DateTime":"\/Date(-62135596800000)\/"}

The XML and CSV formats, on the other hand, seems to handle it correctly:

POST /xml/reply/ServerTime HTTP/1.1 
Host: localhost 
Content-Type: application/xml
Content-Length: length

<ServerTime xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/PtsSampleService.ServiceModel">
  <DateTime xmlns:d2p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/System">
    <d2p1:DateTime>0001-01-01T00:00:00Z</d2p1:DateTime>
    <d2p1:OffsetMinutes>0</d2p1:OffsetMinutes>
  </DateTime>
  <TimeZone xmlns:d2p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/System" i:nil="true" />
</ServerTime>

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/xml
Content-Length: length

<ServerTime xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/PtsSampleService.ServiceModel">
  <DateTime xmlns:d2p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/System">
    <d2p1:DateTime>0001-01-01T00:00:00Z</d2p1:DateTime>
    <d2p1:OffsetMinutes>0</d2p1:OffsetMinutes>
  </DateTime>
  <TimeZone xmlns:d2p1="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/System" i:nil="true" />
</ServerTime>

Why am I asking this instead of using the "XML client"?

This is all about consistency. If the API is not consistent over all possible clients, then it cannot be relied upon! I will either have to drop the JSON formatter (which I can't do because I want to consume it in JavaScript) or I'll have to split the many TimeZoneInfo fields individually... Or find a way to make the JSON serializer to handle it!

And, in fact, XML doesn't work either. The XmlServiceClient gives me this error:

{"Error in line 1 position 290. Element ':AdjustmentRules' contains data from a type that maps to the name 'http://schemas.datacontract.org/2004/07/System:ArrayOfTimeZoneInfo.AdjustmentRule'. The deserializer has no knowledge of any type that maps to this name. Consider using a DataContractResolver or add the type corresponding to 'ArrayOfTimeZoneInfo.AdjustmentRule' to the list of known types - for example, by using the KnownTypeAttribute attribute or by adding it to the list of known types passed to DataContractSerializer."}

Does anyone know why it's not handled by default?

share|improve this question
    
Note that the TimeZoneInfo element is serialized as an empty element with nil="true" in XML. This is how ServiceStack normally serializes null values: they are absent in the JSON, and sent in the response with nil=true in XML. But that doesn't answer why a null value is being sent in the response in the first place. –  esker Jun 22 '13 at 13:02
    
Do you really need to send the full TimeZoneInfo object? Could you send the value of the TimeZoneInfo.Id string property, and use [FindSystemTimeZoneById] to look up the TimeZoneInfo on the client/server? –  esker Jun 22 '13 at 13:10
    
@esker it is a misconception that the TimeZone ID is sufficient. Whenever you are dealing with disparate clients it starts to matter. I've already passing DateTimeOffset, which includes the offset, but the offset is not enough to unambiguously determine the timezone... Was DST into effect? DST depends on political decisions, so a -3GMT timezone can have different DST policies depending on the political area. The TimeZoneInfo takes that into account. I've "solved" it by creating a separate class. It's up to the client to use it now... –  Loudenvier Jun 22 '13 at 21:18
    
Good points about the TimeZone ID and different clients. Creating a separate DTO with all of the necessary properties is a good solution. –  esker Jun 23 '13 at 12:29

2 Answers 2

There is a known problem with serializing TimeZoneInfo to XML: see this question about serializing the object in WCF and the linked MSDN discussion with workaround. Not sure whether the workaround is appropriate for ServiceStack.

But I would suggest avoiding the issue entirely by looking into sending just the Id or some other simple identifier for the time zone.

share|improve this answer
    
I've ended up creating a class called TimeZoneInformation and splitting all the fields... If the client needs anything other than the ID. I believe this ID is tied to Windows, so how a JavaScript client on an embedded device would cope with it? By passing all TimeZoneInfo fields I can give the client all necessary fields to cope with time zones... And since I'm already passing a DateTimeOffset value, they should have no problem. –  Loudenvier Jun 22 '13 at 19:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted

There does not seem to be an elegant way to pass TimeZoneInfo to the client, so I just created a DTO for it unsurprisingly named TimeZoneInformation

[Serializable]
public class TimeZoneInformation
{
    public string Id { get; set; }
    public TimeSpan BaseUtcOffset { get; set; }
    public string DisplayName { get; set; }
    public string DaylightName { get; set; }
    public string StandardName { get; set; }
    public bool SupportsDST { get; set; }
    public static implicit operator TimeZoneInformation(TimeZoneInfo source)
    {
        return new TimeZoneInformation
        {
            Id = source.Id,
            DisplayName = source.DisplayName,
            BaseUtcOffset = source.BaseUtcOffset,
            DaylightName = source.DaylightName,
            StandardName = source.StandardName,
            SupportsDST = source.SupportsDaylightSavingTime,
        };
    }
    public static implicit operator TimeZoneInfo(TimeZoneInformation source)
    {
        return TimeZoneInfo.FindSystemTimeZoneById(source.Id);
    }
}

And my service method not looks like this:

public object Get(ServerTime request)
{
    return new ServerTime
    {
        DateTime = DateTimeOffset.Now,
        TimeZoneInfo = TimeZoneInfo.Local,
    };
}

And the metadata for the call is:

POST /json/reply/ServerTime HTTP/1.1 
Host: localhost 
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: length

{"DateTime":"\/Date(-62135596800000)\/","TimeZoneInfo":{"Id":"String","BaseUtcOffset":"PT0S","DisplayName":"String","DaylightName":"String","StandardName":"String","SupportsDST":false}}

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: length

{"DateTime":"\/Date(-62135596800000)\/","TimeZoneInfo":{"Id":"String","BaseUtcOffset":"PT0S","DisplayName":"String","DaylightName":"String","StandardName":"String","SupportsDST":false}}

An actual call to the method returns this JSON:

{"DateTime":"\/Date(1371925432883-0300)\/","TimeZoneInfo":{"Id":"E. South America Standard Time","BaseUtcOffset":"-PT3H","DisplayName":"(UTC-03:00) Brasília","DaylightName":"Horário brasileiro de verão","StandardName":"Hora oficial do Brasil","SupportsDST":true}}

And XML:

<ServerTime><DateTime><d2p1:DateTime>2013-06-22T21:24:22.2741641Z</d2p1:DateTime><d2p1:OffsetMinutes>-180</d2p1:OffsetMinutes></DateTime><TimeZoneInfo><_x003C_BaseUtcOffset_x003E_k__BackingField>-PT3H</_x003C_BaseUtcOffset_x003E_k__BackingField><_x003C_DaylightName_x003E_k__BackingField>Horário brasileiro de verão</_x003C_DaylightName_x003E_k__BackingField><_x003C_DisplayName_x003E_k__BackingField>(UTC-03:00) Brasília</_x003C_DisplayName_x003E_k__BackingField><_x003C_Id_x003E_k__BackingField>E. South America Standard Time</_x003C_Id_x003E_k__BackingField><_x003C_StandardName_x003E_k__BackingField>Hora oficial do Brasil</_x003C_StandardName_x003E_k__BackingField><_x003C_SupportsDST_x003E_k__BackingField>true</_x003C_SupportsDST_x003E_k__BackingField></TimeZoneInfo></ServerTime>

And all Typed Clients deserialize it perfectly.

Am not 100% happy, but as happy as possible with this...

Some may ask me why I don't send only the ID. The Timezone ID is specific to windows. Since I must talk to disparate clients I can't send an ID an hope they could reconstruct the server's timezone data accordingly. I'm already sending the OFFSET on the DateTimeOffset returned to the clients, but for some scenarios it is not enough, as the offset alone is not sufficient information to determine the timezone or if daylight savings time was into effect. So sending everything that a client could need to interpret the server's date and time correctly was the best solution for this specific application.

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