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I am trying to shuffle a deck of cards.

public void shuffle()
{
    int rand1;
    int rand2;
    Random randomGenerator = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < deck.size(); i++) {

        // pick a random index between 0 and size of the deck - 1
        rand1 = randomGenerator.nextInt(10);
         rand2 = randomGenerator.nextInt(10);

        // swap rand1 and rand2
        Card temp = deck.get (rand1);
        deck.set(rand1, deck.get (rand2)); 
        deck.set(rand2, temp); 
    }
}

Then it says:

java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException; Index:8; size:4(in java.util.ArrayList)

What's wrong?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Mitch Wheat, NINCOMPOOP, Sean Owen, Roman C, laalto Jun 23 '13 at 9:50

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Does deck have 10 cards? Why don't you do randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size()); instead? – Blender Jun 22 '13 at 4:43

This line

rand1 = randomGenerator.nextInt(10);

should be

rand1 = randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size());

and similarly for rand2.

share|improve this answer

Another soultion (just if somebody needs to know)

create a list containing 1 to deck.size(). then shuffle it using Collection.shuffle. Then the list will be shuffled with equal likelihood

share|improve this answer

If this isn't for homework, use Collections.shuffle as @StinePike suggests. If it is, you should know that you are not shuffling correctly. That is, not all results are equally likely. Here is a histogram produced by your algorithm (with @Jason 's correction) shuffling 3 numbers:

[1, 2, 3]: ***********************
[2, 3, 1]: ******************
[3, 2, 1]: **********************
[3, 1, 2]: ******************
[2, 1, 3]: **********************
[1, 3, 2]: **********************

And this is what is produced by a correct algorithm:

[1, 2, 3]: *********************
[2, 3, 1]: *********************
[3, 2, 1]: *********************
[3, 1, 2]: *********************
[2, 1, 3]: *********************
[1, 3, 2]: *********************

Collections.shuffle(deck) is correct, as is this:

public static <T> void shuffle(List<T> deck){
    int rand;
    for (int i = 0; i < deck.size()-1; i++) {
        // We randomly choose rand between i (inclusive) and deck.size()-1
        rand = i + randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size()-i);

        // swap i and rand
        T temp = deck.get(rand);
        deck.set(rand, deck.get(i)); 
        deck.set(i, temp);
    }
}

Here's the code I used to produce the histograms. Note that the permutations don't always appear in the same order, but the same permutations ([2,3,1] and [3,1,2]) are consistently less likely.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Map<List<Integer>,Long> histogram = new HashMap<>();
    int logReps = 20;
    int scaleStar = logReps-7;
    List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(1,2,3));
    for (int i = 0; i<(1<<logReps); i++) {
        List<Integer> templist = new ArrayList<Integer>(list);
        badShuffle(templist);
        if( histogram.containsKey(templist)) {
            histogram.put(templist,histogram.get(templist)+1L);
        } else {
            histogram.put(templist,1L);
        }
    }
    for(Entry<List<Integer>,Long> entry : histogram.entrySet()) {
        System.out.print(entry.getKey()+": ");
        for (int i=0; i<(entry.getValue()>>>scaleStar); i++) {
            System.out.print("*");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }
}
static Random randomGenerator = new Random();
public static void badShuffle(List<Integer> deck){
    int rand1;
    int rand2;

    for (int i = 0; i < deck.size(); i++) {

        // pick a random index between 0 and size of the deck - 1
        rand1 = randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size());
         rand2 = randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size());

        // swap rand1 and rand2
        Integer temp = deck.get (rand1);
        deck.set(rand1, deck.get (rand2)); 
        deck.set(rand2, temp); 
    }
}
public static <T> void goodShuffle(List<T> deck){
    int rand;
    for (int i = 0; i < deck.size()-1; i++) {
        // We randomly choose rand between i (inclusive) and deck.size()-1
        rand = i + randomGenerator.nextInt(deck.size()-i);

        // swap i and rand
        T temp = deck.get(rand);
        deck.set(rand, deck.get(i)); 
        deck.set(i, temp);
    }
}
public static void libraryShuffle(List<Integer> deck){
    Collections.shuffle(deck);
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nice answer. – Mitch Wheat Jun 23 '13 at 3:18

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