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I trying to figure out how to write a class where the base class would supply the accessor functions and then the instanced class only needs to supply the values.

Something like this:

public interface IBaseClass
{
    int GetHandlerID();
}

public abstract class AbstractClass : IBaseClass
{
    private int HandlerID;

    public virtual int  GetHandlerID()
    {
        return (this.HandlerID);
    }

}

public class MyClass : AbstractClass
{
    int HandlerID = 1;
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyClass newClass = new MyClass();
        Console.WriteLine("HandlerID: {0}"), newClass.GetHandlerID() );
    }
}

It doesn't work this way because the class is going to read the HandlerID in the AbstractClass instead of the MyClass variable. Using Virtual or Abstract isn't valid for variables, so I'm not sure how to do this other than having to implement properties every time a new class is derived.

What I'm trying to do is supply an interface for people to build their own plug-in class and it would use the accessor methods that are supplied with the base class. I don't want to have to implement the same property method every time I create a new instance of the class.


I figured out a way to do what I wanted. This way I can have default getters/setters in the base class and not have to create those in each definition that uses the base. It's not quite what I was looking for, but it'll work.

public abstract class AbstractClass : IBaseClass
{
    private int m_HandlerID = 0;

    public int HandlerID
    {
        get { return (this.m_HandlerID); }
        set { this.m_HandlerID = value; }
    }

    private string m_HandlerDescription = "undefined";

    public string HandlerDescription
    {
        get { return this.m_HandlerDescription; }
        set { this.m_HandlerDescription = value; }
    }
}

public class MyClass: AbstractClass
{
    public MyClass()
    {
        HandlerID = 1;
        HandlerDescription = "MyClass";
    }
}


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MyClass newClass = new MyClass();
        Console.WriteLine("Handler: {0}[{1}]", newClass.HandlerDescription, newClass.HandlerID);
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

public abstract class AbstractClass : IBaseClass
{
    public AbstractClass(int handlerId)
    {
       this.HandlerId = handlerId;
    }
    public int  GetHandlerID()
    {
      return (this.HandlerID);
    }
}

public class MyClass : AbstractClass
{
    public MyClass():base(1)//specific handler id
}

How about passing the value through the base constructor

share|improve this answer
    
That would work except there are going to multiple variables in the class and also a status variable. I should have specified that in the question. –  Jack Hubbard Jun 22 '13 at 5:22
    
Ok. Perhaps you can create a single settings object containing all the variables and pass that down as a single parameter? That way it's also flexible and doesn't break the signature if new variables are added –  TGH Jun 22 '13 at 5:25

The derived class needs able to access the HandlerID to ovewrite it, so you'll need to change it in the abstract class from 'private' to 'protected'.

public interface IBaseClass
{
    int GetHandlerID();
}

public abstract class AbstractClass : IBaseClass
{
    protected virtual int HandlerID { get; set; }

    public virtual int GetHandlerID()
    {
        return (HandlerID);
    }
}

public class MyClass : AbstractClass
{
    private int _handlerID = 1;
    protected override int HandlerID { get { return _handlerID; } set { _handlerID = value; } }
}


private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var newClass = new MyClass();
    Console.WriteLine("HandlerID: {0}", newClass.GetHandlerID());
    Console.ReadKey();
}
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