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I read an article in this link http://theholmesoffice.com/mongoose-and-node-js-tutorial/ here there is a code:

exports.teamlist = function(gname,callback){


db.once('open', function(){
  var teamSchema = new mongoose.Schema({
   country: String,
   GroupName: String
  });
  var Team = db.model('Team', teamSchema);
  Team.find({'GroupName':gname}, function (err, teams) {
   if(err){
    onErr(err,callback);
   }else{
    mongoose.connection.close();
    console.log(teams);
    callback("",teams);
   }
  })// end Team.find
 });// end db.once open
};

Here it calls db.once method whereas in other places its used like this

var mongoose = require('mongoose')
   ,Schema = mongoose.Schema
   ,ObjectId = Schema.ObjectId;

var postSchema = new Schema({
    thread: ObjectId,
    date: {type: Date, default: Date.now},
    author: {type: String, default: 'Anon'},
    post: String
});

module.exports = mongoose.model('Post', postSchema);

In the router part its used like this

exports.show = (function(req, res) {
    Thread.findOne({title: req.params.title}, function(error, thread) {
        var posts = Post.find({thread: thread._id}, function(error, posts) {
          res.send([{thread: thread, posts: posts}]);
        });
    })
});

And in the app.js there is

var mongoose = require('mongoose');
mongoose.connect('mongodb://localhost/norum');

I dont understand why these two have different approach and which one is the better one and why? Can Anyone please help me. One thing that I have observed is that the second approach is the one most used. SO please help me as to which one is a better approach. I know this is mainly concerned regarding creation of the schemes in Mongodb, and so the once method looks little better. But still I am not at all sure. Please help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Basically, in the first approach - it mearly shows you what you can do with the mongoose. It presumes that somewhere you were opening a connection to the database (presumably a few string of code back). Then it listens to the event and does all the job later. It's only there to show you what you can do.

For intance, this creates a mongoose model (it doesnt rely on the database connection being open) - hence it could be included from a separate file with ease and generally be written as a module as it is in the second approach

var teamSchema = new mongoose.Schema({
   country: String,
   GroupName: String
  });
var Team = db.model('Team', teamSchema);

Later on in the first approach you close the connection to the database, but thats not the thing you would want to do in the real application. You have a connection pool, and use it to frequently query the database, closing the connection is only needed when you plan to stop the application from running.

  Team.find({'GroupName':gname}, function (err, teams) {
   if(err){
    onErr(err,callback);
   }else{
    mongoose.connection.close();
    console.log(teams);
    callback("",teams);
   }

First line - you perform find on the database, if no err was returned - you close the connection, log the results, etc..

Anyway, to sum up - first approach is generally a show-off, second - is what its like in a real world - where you separate logic, make models reusable and includable, where you have router logic

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks..I got the point now. Really thanks. –  Saransh Mohapatra Jun 22 '13 at 7:55
    
I wrote the original article as part of a series building up parts of the stack. The connection method here doesn't show best practice - you should generally open your connection when your application starts, and close it when it ends. I wrote an additional post clarifying this: theholmesoffice.com/mongoose-connection-best-practice –  Simon Holmes Sep 24 '13 at 14:02

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