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var Person = function (name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

Person.prototype.scream = function () {
    this.WhatToScream.screamAge();
}

Person.prototype.WhatToScream = function () {
    this.screamAge = function () {
        alert('I AM ' + this.age + ' YEARS OLD!!!');
    }
    this.screamName = function () {
        alert('MY NAME IS ' + this.name + '!!!')
    }
}

var man = new Person('Berna', 21);
man.scream();


// This code raises:
// Uncaught TypeError: Object WhatToScream has no method 'screamAge'
share|improve this question
2  
WhatToScream is a function not an object. In any case, why don't you just add the methods straight into the prototype? – elclanrs Jun 22 '13 at 6:56
    
I can't, my code need to handle new methods into WhatToScream. Later, people are going to add like this.screamHuh(){ alert("HUH!") }, and this screamHuh() must be accessible by scream... – BernaMariano Jun 22 '13 at 7:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a re-definiton that is closer to your original code:

Person.prototype.scream = function () {
  new this.WhatToScream().screamAge();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This one did what I needed first... – BernaMariano Jun 22 '13 at 7:38
    
@c69 I don't know what I did, I can't make it work anymore.. I'm trying for methods in this.WhatToScream to get all ways to scream, I currently have 2, but it doesn't seem to retrieve a single one... – BernaMariano Jun 22 '13 at 8:36
1  
@BernaMariano should be for (methods in (new this.WhatToScream) ) in this case – c69 Jun 22 '13 at 8:39
    
@c69 Thank you very much! – BernaMariano Jun 22 '13 at 9:18
    
@BernaMariano: If this answer solved your problem, consider upvoting and accepting it, by clicking on the large green tick mark (✔) under the answer's score. – Madara Uchiha Jun 22 '13 at 16:06
var Person = function (name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

Person.prototype.scream = function () {
    // get function screamAge from container WhatToScream,
    // which is available in the instance of the object,
    // because it was defined in the prototype
    // and then call it with thisArg being current this,
    // which is pointing to current container,
    // * which at runtime is man
    this.WhatToScream.screamAge.call(this);
}

Person.prototype.WhatToScream = {
    screamAge: function () {
        alert('I AM ' + this.age + ' YEARS OLD!!!');
    },
    screamName: function () {
        alert('MY NAME IS ' + this.name + '!!!')
    }
}

var man = new Person('Berna', 21);
man.scream();

If you want to keep WhatToScream as a function, you will need to call it to use the object it returns:

Person.prototype.scream = function () {
    this.WhatToScream().screamAge.call(this);
}

Person.prototype.WhatToScream = function () {
    return {
        screamAge: function () { ... }, 
        screamName: function () { ... },
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would appreciate if anyone knew a solution that keeps WhatToScream a function... Else I'm gonna use your answer – BernaMariano Jun 22 '13 at 7:14
    
In that case - use module pattern, see the second part of updated answer. Notice the () – c69 Jun 22 '13 at 7:21
1  
@c69 You updated right as I was about to submit my post, doing just that. Would be a wise idea to cache that object after the first time generating it. – SpenserJ Jun 22 '13 at 7:24
1  
@BernaMariano: Yes I did. I would still change the structure before your API becomes a mess. Keeping your current structure you'll eventually find yourself fixing the context of this in every other function when it gets more complex and will be harder to track closures and encapsulate your code. – elclanrs Jun 22 '13 at 7:25
1  
@SpenserJ yes, good point, but it will (further) convolute the answer as we will get into "the hard problem cache invalidation" ;) – c69 Jun 22 '13 at 7:27

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