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I have a few dozen classes which all implement the same interface and many of the methods have identical implementation. I have to do a lot of copy and paste whenever I add a new class. How can I get less code duplication?

I've heard that you should put the common code in a helper class but a lot of these methods are really trivial so calling a helper method is barely any simpler than doing the actual work.

Inheritance would save re-declaring all these methods but it would make it messy for the few classes that don't have the identical implementation.

Examples:

Identical in nearly every class...

Public Sub ThingWasDeleted(ByVal deletedThing As Thing) Implements Iinterface.ThingWasDeleted
        If MyThing Is deletedThing Then
            MyThing = Nothing
        End If
End Sub

...but occasionally different:

Public Sub ThingWasDeleted(ByVal deletedThing As Thing) Implements IInterface.ThingWasDeleted
    'Do nothing
End Sub

Identical in every class but already just as simple as calling a common helper method:

Public ReadOnly Property DisplayName() As String Implements IInterface.DisplayName
        Get
            Return DisplayNameShared
        End Get
End Property
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1  
Use an abstract class - put the most commonly used version of the method(s) in that class, and override them as necessary in the inheriting classes. (Abstract = MustInherit in VB.NET, IIRC). –  Tim Jun 22 '13 at 8:53
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you put these methods in a helper class, wouldn't that make it just as messy (if not more) than having an abstract base class where you can override the base class's functionality when needed?

For example:

Public MustInherit Class BaseClass

    Public ReadOnly Property DisplayName() As String
        Get 
            Return DisplayNameShared
        End Get
    End Property

    Public Overridable Sub ThingWasDeleted(ByVal deletedThing As Thing)

        If MyThing Is deletedThing Then
            MyThing = Nothing
        End If
    End Sub  
End Class

This provide a definition of the property that all inheriting classes can use, and gives the inheriting class an option to override and create their own implementation of ThingWasDeleted.

For example:

Public Class MyClass 
    Inherits BaseClass

    Public Overrides Sub ThingWasDeleted(ByVal deletedThing As Thing)

        ' Do nothing
    End Sub
End Class

On the other hand, if you wrote a helper class, you'd have to define every method, and the developer (which may or may not be you) would have to know which method to change. Additionally, instead of having the option to use the existing functionality in the base (abstract) class, every class you create will have to call each of the proper helper methods.

Personally, I prefer the former option, mainly because the inheriting classes don't have to call anything to get the base functionality established in the base class, and can override what they need to on a case-by-case basis. Conversely, having them all in a helper class means you have to at least write the code to call each of the necessary helper methods in every class you have.

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As an additional suggestion, you can have both an interface and a base class (implementing the interface) that provides a default implementation. Classes that use the default implementation inherit from the base class. Classes that need to have a different, incompatible base class can still use the interface and implement the methods themselves. As long as consumers only use the interface and never the base class, this works fine. –  Sven Jun 22 '13 at 9:38
    
@Sven - Interesting approach. Not sure I'd use it - seems like using a base class and overriding as necessary is more streamlined. Might depend on how much variation there is between the classes though...if you have bunch of classes and the methods implementations are very similar but slight different, your option would probably be better. Though I'd look at the overall design at that point to see if there was a way it could be tweaked or refactored. –  Tim Jun 22 '13 at 9:45
    
It's mainly useful if you have a complex hierarchy where not all classes that need the interface are necessarily able to use the base class (because .Net doesn't have multiple inheritance). .Net has a few examples of this pattern, e.g. DictionaryBase which makes implementing a non-generic IDictionary easier, but if you need a different base class you don't have to use it and can implement IDictionary directly. I also know the pattern from Hadoop, where the Configured class provides a default implementation of the Configurable interface that you can use, but you don't have to. –  Sven Jun 22 '13 at 10:34
    
@Sven - Ah..that makes more sense in that situation. Thanks for explaining :) –  Tim Jun 22 '13 at 10:35
    
Spot on suggestions, +1 –  tcarvin Jun 22 '13 at 15:26
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