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I have a table ORDERS, there is a field DATE_ADD, date format is 2010-02-28 20:48:09. I need to find out the dates where there has been no order. I tried

SELECT * FROM `orders` HAVING COUNT(date_add) < 1

but it returns 0 results although there must be some. Where am I wrong here in this query?

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HAVING is the partner of GROUP BY. Try using them together –  Raptor Jun 22 '13 at 10:24
    
how many field u have ?..i mean columns ?? –  Ahmed Jun 22 '13 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

Try this:

SELECT DATE(date_add), COUNT(date_add) AS cnt FROM `orders` GROUP BY DATE(date_add) HAVING COUNT(date_add) < 1
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You can't query the orders table for data that it doesn't contain. Or, to phrase, this differently, you need a table of all available dates. If you have a calendar table, then you do such a query as:

select c.*
from calendar c left outer join
     (select distinct cast(date_add as date) as date_add
      from orders
     ) o
     on c.date = o.date_add
where o.date_add is null

Note: You need to convert date_add to a date (removing the time portion). This varies by database. The above is SQL Server syntax. It could also be something like date(date_add) (MySQL) or trunc(date_add) (Oracle) or something else.

If you don't have a calendar table, then creating one is very database specific. If almost all dates have orders, you can do a trick like this:

select driver.dte
from (select dte
      from (select distinct cast(date_added + n.n as date) as dte
            from orders
           ) o cross join
           (select 0 as n union all select 1 as n union all select 2 as n
           )
     ) driver left outer join
     (select distinct cast(date_add as date) as date_add
      from orders
     ) o
     on driver.dte = o.date_add
where o.date_add is null
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